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Posts Tagged ‘Yvonne Barteau’

In the horse industry, we often feel bound to our chosen discipline, breed, or horse sport. We proclaim our undying devotion to specific organizations and vow to remain true, in sickness and in health, to trainers, instructors, and clinicians. We divide ourselves into helmets and hats, jodhpurs and jeans, competitors and non.

But there is a strangeness to this self-imposed segregation in that we can all surely come together, whatever our difference in preferred coat color and saddle shape, in agreement over one thing: our love for the horse. And, it is no secret that “cross-training” is as good for the equine athlete as it is for the human athlete, so it benefits us on multiple levels to open our minds to the “other” and maybe even give it a try.

One master of multiple disciplines is Jonathan Field, author of the stunning book THE ART OF LIBERTY TRAINING FOR HORSES, in which he teaches us how developing communication skills and our relationship with our horse through liberty benefits all that we do—both on the ground and in the saddle. Quick responses to subtle cues, clear aids, and a relaxed and attentive horse: These are the keys to liberty, and they are also objectives when you ride, drive, and interact with your horse on a daily basis around the barn.

“I read THE ART OF LIBERTY TRAINING FOR HORSES all in one evening and enjoyed and agreed with all of the very great wisdom that Jonathan so precisely shared,” says Grand Prix dressage rider Yvonne Barteau. “He is a true horseman, and I have seen him work a number of times in the past and think this book is a great portrayal of his life, his training, and his process. Every horseperson should read this book, even if they do not want to do liberty work.”

 

Grand Prix dressage rider Yvonne Barteau and GP Raymeister.

Grand Prix dressage rider Yvonne Barteau and GP Raymeister.

 

In addition to kudos from the dressage world, Jonathan has worked closely with the legendary George Morris, including creating a DVD set with the former US show jumping chef d’equipe. For more information check out the trailer below, or visit Jonathan’s website JonathanField.net.

 

 

Jonathan tells the following story about a jumper he reschooled in THE ART OF LIBERTY TRAINING FOR HORSES:

“Many years ago I took on Tommy, a jumping horse that was given to me for free. I was his last resort. I was told that Tommy wasn’t ever easy to ride, and it got worse when jumps were present. He’d start at a nice pace, but as soon as he was pointed at the first jump, he would speed up twice as fast. Two jumps later, he’d be even faster, and finally, he’d bolt. Soon, all it took was the sight of a jump to cause the bolt reaction.

“The key with a horse like Tommy is recognizing the weak link in the communication between horse and human. In his case it was neutral, which is very common for performance horses. They come into the arena, are worked hard, and only rest back at the barn. Neutral or active neutral is not a part of the training program. So, with each ride they get a little more wired from anticipation. Because of those nerves, their flight instinct gets closer to the surface.

“Flight instinct can’t be taken completely out of any horse, and I never took it out of Tommy. I just recognized the best way to help him was to recreate the arena as a place of comfort, relaxation, and connection to the rider. I also had to keep him moving in a controlled way when he wasn’t connected to me.”

 

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

You can read the rest of the story about Tommy, as well as learn how teaching your horse neutral and active neutral can benefit all that you do together in THE ART OF LIBERTY TRAINING FOR HORSES, available from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is FREE.

Plus, preview a lesson from the book on how to find the neutral sweet spot by CLICKING HERE.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER NOW

Trafalgar Square Books, the leading publisher of horse books and DVDs, is a small, privately owned company based on a farm in rural Vermont.

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FEI dressage trainer/rider Yvonne Barteau with Douglas Puterbaugh, author of THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS OF DRESSAGE.

FEI dressage trainer/rider Yvonne Barteau with Douglas Puterbaugh, author of THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS OF DRESSAGE.

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS OF DRESSAGE is a unique and special book,” says FEI dressage trainer/rider Yvonne Barteau. “I have been a collector of equine literature for many years, and this book has earned a spot on the ‘top shelf’ in my library. I have recommended it to all of my students as a ‘must read’ and will continue to do so. Author Douglas Puterbaugh covers vital and important rider information in an entertaining, engaging, and compelling manner.”

What kind of “vital rider information” will you find in THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS OF DRESSAGE? Check out the attributes Douglas lists as the 10 qualities of a good instructor/trainer—something every one of us should keep in mind as we spend our lives striving to improve our horsemanship and become better partners to our horses.

“Find a good trainer is like finding a good mechanic,” says Douglas. “When you do, embrace him/her because he/she’s the difference between your satisfaction and disappointment.”

 

A good instructor/trainer should:

1  Treat you as an individual and recognize that different personality types require different approaches. He/she should tailor teaching style accordingly.

Evaluate your training goals.

3  Be well-rounded him/herself. A good trainer is constantly trying to improve in his/her own right—studying, practicing, learning from others.

4  Help you improve. A committed student taught by a good trainer should experience skills that improve steadily over time—that is, if the trainer is given enough time and the student is giving enough effort.

5  Work well with you. A comfortable relationship will yield more results than a difficult one. Better to look forward to your lessons than to dread them.

6  Be able to improve diminished gaits or correct spoiled horses. This is a skill, beyond the abilities of many otherwise capable trainers.

7  Not be a bully. A trainer should encourage your potential, not discourage your efforts.

8  Display infinite patience with both horse and pupil.

9  Never grow tired of repeating things that need to be repeated.

10  Be inspiring and kind, for even the most talented trainer will find it difficult to instill confidence in his/her students when prickly or unapproachable.

 

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS OF DRESSAGE is available from the TSB online bookstore.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY!

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TSB spent much of its day at the Palm Beach Dressage Derby.

TSB spent much of its day at the Palm Beach Dressage Derby.

We faced the morning—our first in Florida after our whirlwind exploration of Ft. Worth, Texas, and its environs—with great optimism in terms of the weather: The sun was struggling out from behind the clouds and the grass in West Palm Beach is most certainly green. One step out-of-doors, however, sent us running back up the eight floors we’d just descended in search for the jackets and sweatshirts we’d at first so blithely left behind. It was COLD today!!!

Despite our issues with the GPS in Texas, we for some foolish reason thought technology deserving of a second (third?) chance, but of course it brought us only to the very-much-locked gate (no doubt the “rear” entrance) of the gated horse community in which the Palm Beach Dressage Derby was taking place…so we waited for some kind, semi-local soul with a key code to come along and let us follow him in. I’ve never been in an area where the law states (and signage, too!) that drivers must proceed slowly due to the presence of horses…it made me feel rather empowered, despite the fact that I was behind the wheel and not in the saddle. I guess it helps to know that somewhere, sometimes, horses and riders get the right of way and a little respect from passing motorists.

We spent a jolly morning with Kathy Connelly, international dressage rider, trainer, and coach; met up with TSB author Jane Savoie’s husband Rhett; and had an absolutely terrific time with Yvonne Barteau and the ever-engaging GP Raymeister, the handsome Holsteiner stallion she’s trained and ridden for seven years. Ray is full of character, and we always love getting the chance to see him go!

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We finally left the Derby grounds to visit with Betsy Steiner, author of A GYMNASTIC RIDING SYSTEM USING MIND, BODY & SPIRIT, and had the pleasure of watching her long-line two very different (in terms of conformation, personality, and way of going) horses as she explained her views on the benefits of long-line work. It was really fun to go through her barn with her and see the variety of horses she has in training, including Warmbloods, a Lusitano, and two Fjords!

We wrapped up our day with dinner in Wellington with TSB author and USEF “R” Hunter/Hunter Equitation judge Geoff Teall (yes, more eating!), which helped us segue from our day in “dressage land” to tomorrow’s show jumping Grand Prix. We’ll post photos and news from the event here on our blog, FB, Twitter, and Instagram.

I’m sure hoping the Florida weather gods will turn a kind (aka warm) eye toward us poor Northeasterners with only a short-term pass to the land of sun, but we hear it will again be COLD tomorrow…and it may even RAIN.

And believe it or not, even in the cold, Martha and I both somehow managed to end the day with a sunburn! I know that when in Wellington one shouldn’t really complain, but it just doesn’t seem fair…

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