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Posts Tagged ‘WEG 2010’

TSB caught up with international dressage star, trainer, motivational speaker, author, and entrepreneur Jane Savoie this month as we celebrate the release of her new book JANE SAVOIE’S DRESSAGE 101 (on sale all this month at the TSB bookstore!) We got to talk about what’s new with her line of Eq-Equisense “sensor-enhanced” tack, which made a splash with international audiences at WEG in 2010. Plus, we got to find out what’s in her refrigerator…or rather, what’s not.

TSB: You always manage to have a multitude of interesting projects going at once. For example, your Eq-Equisense “sensor-enhanced” tack seems to offer riders a legitimate way to “measure” their body position and correct it in real time. What’s up with Equisense in 2011? Are there new developments or special promotions we should know about in the months ahead?

JS: We are opening Training Centers throughout the country. The first one is opening this month (May) at Mistover Farm in Pawling, New York.

TSB: You have established a distinct online presence over the last few years, and much of your work is particularly well-suited to digital forums. What role do you see social media such as Facebook playing in the development of the horse industry in coming years?

JS: Our country is huge, and Social Media allows us to connect with riders not only in this country but all over the world. Yesterday, I heard from three of my Dressage Mentor members (from South Africa, New Zealand, and Hong Kong, respectively) about the success they’ve had using the techniques they’re learning about on my membership site.

TSB author Jane Savoie on her Grand Prix horse Moshi. "He's amazing!" she says.

TSB: What are your personal riding goals for 2011 and beyond?

JS: Continuing to ride Moshi at Grand Prix. He gets better all the time. We’ve finally mastered the one-tempi’s and he does piaffe, passage, and the transitions between the two on a thought. He’s amazing!

TSB: If you were trapped on a desert island with a horse and a book, what breed of horse would it be and which book would you choose?

JS: Probably a Friesian because they’re so affectionate. Moshi is like a black lab in a horse suit. If I took a horse book it would be Complete Training of Horse and Rider by Alois Podhajsky, and if I took a “fun” book I’d choose Knight in Shining Armor by Jude Devereaux.

TSB: What’s in your refrigerator at all times?

JS: It’s usually pretty empty. (And I’ve gone as long as two years without an oven!) Don’t cook. Don’t miss it.

TSB: What is your idea of perfect happiness?

JS: Patting my dog, Indiana Jones Savoie.

TSB: Tell us about the first time you remember sitting on a horse.

JS: I was eight. I rode a 26-year-old horse named “Old Lady.”

TSB: Tell us about the first time you remember falling off a horse.

JS: My third ride. I got run away with on a trail ride. All I remember is the trees going by really fast as I hung on my horse’s neck—until I couldn’t hang on any more.

TSB: What is the quality you most like in a friend?

JS: Loyalty.

TSB: What is the quality you most like in a horse?

JS:  Good work ethic.

TSB: If you could do one thing on horseback that you haven’t yet done, what would it be?

JS: Ride in the 2012 London Olympics.

TSB: What is your idea of the perfect meal?

JS: Lobster and a baked potato.

TSB: What is your idea of the perfect vacation?

JS: I haven’t been on one for so long, I really have to think about this. Maybe visit places that fascinate me—Italy, Hawaii, England, France, Africa.

TSB: If you could have a conversation with one famous person, alive or dead, who would it be?

JS: Tony Robbins.

TSB: What is your motto?

JS: “Those who say it can’t be done shouldn’t interrupt the people doing it.”— Chinese Proverb

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World famous trainer Lynn Palm on What About Lark

Sand flying. The sound of approaching surf almost drowning the muffled staccato of hooves-on-beach. Bareback and bridleless, your hands buried in your horse’s mane, sun on your skin and wind in your hair–who HASN’T indulged in this riding fantasy?

Although your geographic location may indeed identify surf and beach as purely fantastic, a bridleless romp on horseback that is all about fun and freedom and not at all about hold-on-and-pray-for-your-dear-life is completely within the realm of reality. It all comes down to a little from you (that is, your body control and balance) and a whole lot from that thousand-plus-pound horse of yours (his body control and balance).

World famous horse trainer Lynn Palm (winner of 34 World and Reserve World Championships, and four “Superhorse” titles, among others) maintains that “collection” is the key to getting your horse to be light, balanced, and willing, and ready to take on any riding challenge with you on board. This isn’t just about a headset–this is about changing your horse’s way of going incrementally, and through TOTALLY doable exercises.

Too many of us engage in the push-pull, “kick the horse into the bridle” while sawing his nose down, mistakenly thinking that the result is at all desirable or ideal for the horse. This usually isn’t our fault, as until now collection has been misinterpreted, poorly defined, and badly taught at all levels and in all disciplines. Lynn is striving to change all that through her clinics (catch her at Equine Affaire in Ohio, April 7-10, 2011) and her latest book THE RIDER’S GUIDE TO REAL COLLECTION…on sale this month at the TSB bookstore (along with other great horse training titles–check ’em out HERE).

Lynn performed bridleless at the 2010 World Equestrian Games in Lexington, Kentucky, on her gorgeous stallion Rugged Painted Lark:

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