TSB’s Top Three Things to Do with Your Horse as Summer Ends and Fall Begins

Color is coming to the VT hills...here Rob the Quarter Horse looks over the town of Woodstock.

Color is coming to the VT hills…here Rob the Quarter Horse looks over the town of Woodstock.

It’s official: kids are back in school and for those of us in the northern regions of the riding world, temperatures are dropping, horses are friskier in the morning, and jackets have once again become a necessity.

It was a great summer of riding though, right? Whether you’ve had a busy competition schedule or just lots of time on the trails, here are three ways you can spend some quality time with your horse while taking care of him, taking care of yourself, and taking a little breather in between seasons:

 

1 Take Care of Your Horse

The range of motion in your horse’s forelimbs becomes restricted when the muscles that are responsible for moving the front legs forward and backward accumulate tension and are unable to release. Releasing this tension allows the horse to step out further and leads to a more fluid and extended gait. At the end of a long riding season, you can release accumulated tension in your horse’s front end with these easy exercise from BEYOND HORSE MASSAGE by Jim Masterson.

  • Stand at the horse’s left shoulder, facing forward.
  • Pick up the horse’s left foot.
  • Rest the horse’s ankle in your right hand and place your left hand on the horse’s knee.
  • Allow the horse to relax the leg and shoulder as much as he is able.
  • Slowly guide the leg down and back, straightening the leg and lowering the foot as you go.
  • Encourage the horse to rest in this position as long as he can by keeping your hand on the leg or foot.

 

2  Take Care of Yourself

Like our horses, after a summer of riding, we can actually experience limited mobility in our hips and excessive contractions in our adductor muscles. We can reverse the resulting “clothespin effect” with a simple yoga pose called Happy Baby from YOGA FOR EQUESTRIANS by Linda Benedik and Veronica Wirth.

  • Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Take a few breaths and feel your spine contact the floor. Exhale and bring your knees up toward your chest.
  • Extend your arms along the inside of your legs, taking hold of the arches of your feet with your hands. Open your knees and drop your thighs to the sides of your torso. Bring your shins perpendicular to the ground, the soles of your feet facing the sky.
  • As you exhale, feel your sacrum, shoulders, and knees drop down into the floor. Bring your attention to your hips; let them relax. Let go with each breath. Relax into this stretch and hold for at least four deep breaths.
  • Release your feet and slowly bring them back down to the floor.

 

3  Take a Little Breather

We don’t always need to climb on board our horses to spend quality time with them. Sometimes, just a quite hour hand-grazing can be the best team-building exercise there is. Another idea is trying your hand at Wild Agility, as Vanessa Bee, founder of the International Horse Agility Club describes in THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK.

“Wild Agility is an enormously companionable thing to do,” she says. “Friends and I go off with our lunch in backpacks and with our dogs and horses—and just travel….These are golden times for us: The dogs, humans and horses all seem content as we move along with all the time in the world.”

All you need for Wild Agility is a halter and a lead rope, and an afternoon to “play.” Move across country at whatever speed suits you, playing with obstacles and challenges along the way: jump ditches, logs, and banks; weave through woods and trees; pass under low branches; cross streams, swim in lakes…you name it!

TSB Managing Director Martha Cook enjoys end of summer on Buster, her Morgan.

TSB Managing Director Martha Cook enjoys end of summer on Buster, her Morgan.

However you choose to spend the first weekend after the unofficial “end of summer,” we at TSB hope it is with your horse, and it brings both of you relaxation, friendship, and hope for the autumn ahead.

You can find all the books mentioned in this post, and many more, at the TSB online bookstore. CLICK HERE TO VISIT NOW.

Check Out the Article About Horse Agility Featuring TSB Author Vanessa Bee in the August/September Issue of Holistic Horse Magazine!

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“Horse Agility fosters clear positive communication,” writes Horse Agility Accredited Trainer Heidi Potter in the August/September Holistic Horse cover feature article, “[as well as] improved confidence, and healthy emotional interactions between horses and their handlers.”

Horse trainer Vanessa Bee,, founder of the International Horse Agility Club, has developed not only a progressive system of training that moves horse and handler from work together on the lead rope to free work through, around, and over obstacles, it lays the foundation for the new equestrian sport that is taking the world by storm. Whether you dream of competing your horse and earning points and championship awards, or you simply wish to spend time with other horse people in a fun, exciting, social setting, Horse Agility competitions and “play days” offer an all-shapes-ages-sizes-and-abilities option in a world that has long excluded those who love and own horses, but don’t necessarily want to ride.

“We need to change the way we think about horses and the sports and activities we so often pursue with them,” says Vanessa. She sees no reason the horse cannot enjoy your time together so much, he will choose to “play” with you—over, under, and through obstacles, without a lead rope, even when loose in a large, grassy pasture.

Vanessa Bee has helped spread Horse Agility as an fun and safe horse sport that anyone can learn to enjoy around the world.

Vanessa Bee has helped spread Horse Agility as an fun and safe horse sport that anyone can learn to enjoy around the world.

Hard to believe? Check out the article in the August/September issue of HOLISTIC HORSE (CLICK HERE to view the digital edition) and try Horse Agility for yourself! THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK and HORSE AGILITY: THE DVD by Vanessa Bee have all you need to get started in the sport, including lessons in handling and body language, directions for obstacle and course construction, and information for managing competitions and “play days.”

Be sure to visit thehorseagilityclub.com for information about Horse Agility events in your area.

Live in New England? There’s a Horse Agility Training & Live Competition at the New England Center for Horsemanship in Guilford, Vermont, on August 24th, 2013. CLICK HERE for details.

International Horse Agility Club Founder Vanessa Bee Flies All the Way from England to See Buck Brannaman in Colorado–And Tells Us About It!

Vanessa Bee, founder of the International Horse Agility Club, spent the weekend at the Buck Brannaman clinic in Colorado.

Vanessa Bee, founder of the International Horse Agility Club, spent the weekend at the Buck Brannaman clinic in Colorado.

Vanessa Bee, founder of the International Horse Agility Club and author of THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK and HORSE AGILITY: THE DVD, is in the United States beginning her North American clinic tour (see our previous post for dates and locations). Part of her reason for making the cross-Atlantic trek was to see Buck Brannaman teach, in person!

“I absolutely love the 7 CLINICS WITH BUCK BRANNAMAN DVDs and have watched them over and over,” said Vanessa when she announced her tour in February. “They are completely addictive. I am so impressed, but I do have questions…and there’s only one way to find the answers—ask the man himself! So I’m flying over from the UK to watch him work in Colorado…that’s how good I think this man is!”

Vanessa was kind enough to share some of her observations from the time she spent this past weekend at the Buck Brannaman clinic in Hayden, Colorado—it is always so interesting to hear one trainer’s observations of another! Check it out:

“We flew from England to Denver and drove over the mountains in blizzard conditions to get here, but I knew it was worth it. I had already watched the excellent 7 Clinics DVDs many times and of course had a few questions. I was hoping that by watching everything in real time I would be able to see the techniques and changes in the horse more clearly.

“Fortunately, I brought my binoculars. I know some people thought this was a bit strange, but I’m an eccentric English woman so can get away with most things! Those binoculars made all the difference—I could really see the man work, when he quit as the horse got the answer—MAGIC!

“The first day was split into two parts: The morning was Colt Starting and the afternoon was Horsemanship 1. The colts were all shapes and sizes with handlers of varying ability, so Buck had his work cut out keeping everyone moving forward. First he made sure everyone could move their horse’s feet and retain a safety bubble that the horse would respect. He gave a nice demonstration of teaching a horse where the boundary was and commented that you have to learn how much to do that says STOP!

“You have to mean it but not by being mean to the horse.

“I had my first question answered on when to use the flag and how the horse knows when it means something to him and when he has to ignore it. It’s all in the hand position, which transmits the intention of the handler. I invested in my own BB Flag, and somehow I have to get it into my suitcase for the journey home!

“At the end of the session Buck gave everyone homework: They had to practice flexion, backing up, picking the rider up from the fence, lowering the head, and putting the bridle on. And they had to practice because, as he said, he would know in the morning if they hadn’t!

“It was going to be interesting to see if all the colt starters had done their homework, and they did look pretty good as they lead their horses into the arena. Buck was warming up his horse first thing. He talked about how he was looking for ’weightlessness’ as he was working. It was quiet and precise, the way he worked. Disengaging the hind end, moving the front over, backing up just seeking the moment when there was no weight and he instantly quit.

“I used my binoculars zoomed in on every move. I don’t know how anyone could see the finer details and understand when the quit was valid without being close up. That’s why the 7 Clinics DVDs are so good. I shall certainly be studying these in even more depth on my return home.

We're lucky to have Vanessa Bee reporting back from this fabulous Buck clinic experience!

We’re lucky to have Vanessa Bee reporting back from this fabulous Buck clinic experience!

“Buck is direct, I like that. He made a few choice comments, including: ‘If I could get my students to spend less time on ’Wastebook’ and more time with horses they’d have a stable full of bridle horses.’

“I’ve watched a lot of horse clinics and horsemen and I can tell you that Buck is the only person I’ve seen whose feet are the horse’s feet. He just moves those feet like they were their own. It’s smooth and you never feel a wince or a jar as you watch him work. His timing is fantastic.

“He was very honest and direct and I really enjoyed his style of teaching. Buck said, ‘Everything I do with a horse is incremental that’s why I’m successful with them.’ In other words, he tries never to overwhelm the horse and give him too much to think about.

“Buck told us that Ray Hunt was always saying to him: ‘Do less sooner, then you won’t need to do more later.’

“I and my binoculars are beginning to see that now.”

Thanks, Vanessa, for making it feel like we were at the clinic with you!

Click image to order!

Click image to order!

You can order the 7 CLINICS WITH BUCK BRANNAMAN DVD SERIES, plus Vanessa Bee’s HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK and HORSE AGILITY DVD at the TSB online bookstore.

CLICK HERE FOR THE BUCK BRANNAMAN DVDS

CLICK HERE FOR THE HORSE AGILITY BOOK/DVD

Master a Simple Horse Agility Obstacle…and Meet Vanessa Bee, Founder of the International Horse Agility Club!

horseagilitygrowing

Over the past few decades, an evolution in how we go about training horses has encouraged horse owners to spend more time handling their horse on the ground in order to achieve good behavior, mutual trust, and a healthy partnership—before they ever think about getting in the saddle. This has created a generation of horsemen and women perfectly poised to pursue the competitive and social benefits of the sport of Horse Agility.

Thanks to the International Horse Agility Club and its founder, Vanessa Bee, Horse Agility is now the fastest-growing new equestrian sport in the world. Horse lovers from North America, Europe, Great Britain, Australia, and indeed, all over, are discovering the joys and benefits of competing their horse from the ground, over obstacles. The sport is a natural evolution in today’s age of natural horsemanship: fun, exciting, competitive sport with the well-being of the horse in mind.

Vanessa Bee is working tirelessly to bring Horse Agility as an organized sport to new heights, and with her bestselling book THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK and brand new HORSE AGILITY DVD, she provides clear, step-by-step instruction on how to get started with your horse.

Ready to give Horse Agility a try? Here’s how to practice one simple obstacle at home—and as an added benefit, this obstacle helps “bombproof” your horse so you have a more enjoyable and safe partnership, whatever you choose to do together!

Learn how to master The Curtain obstacle in THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK by Vanessa Bee.

Learn how to master The Curtain obstacle in THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK by Vanessa Bee.

Passing Through a Curtain

From THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK by Vanessa Bee

The goal of this Horse Agility obstacle is that the horse trusts the handler enough to pass through a curtain of plastic or fabric ribbons.

 

Equipment

You will need a “curtain” of ribbons at least 4 feet (1.5m) wide supported on a frame at least 7 feet (2m) high. The archway I use is made of push-together plastic plumbing pipe with straight lengths and elbows to create a frame about 7 feet (2m) high by 5 feet (1.5m) wide. Ribbons can be made of plastic or fabric—I’ve used butcher’s shop fly curtains and also had great success with an old shower curtain cut into strips. Be inventive, as long as it is safe. Make each ribbon between 3/4 in and 1 1/2 in (2cm and 4cm) in width and long enough to reach to within 18 inches (30cm) off the ground.

 

How to Do It

 

1. The principles of leading your horse through a narrow gap really come into play here (I teach you the steps to doing this well and safely in THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK). Always start by leading the horse on a lead rope.Begin by making the curtain really easy to walk through: Tie the ribbons back out of the way at first, and as he gains confidence, drop down one or two lengths of ribbon at a time so he slowly gets used to it.

 

2. When the horse is confident about going through the curtain on the lead rope, go right back to the beginning by tying the curtain back and ask him to go through “free” (I teach you how to work with your horse over obstacles at liberty—without a lead rope—in THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK). Again, drop one or two ribbons down at a time. Don’t be tempted to ask your free horse to go through the full curtain straight from doing it on a lead rope. One of the keys to being successful in free work is to make it easy for the horse to do what you ask and build on his success.

 

Common Problems

The main thing that causes issues here is the “solid” look of the curtain, so be sure to work with the curtain open before dropping the ribbons down.

One of the things I’ve found is that a lot of horses don’t like the feel of the ribbons running over their sides and back as they run through the curtain, so you must be careful and keep yourself out of the way when you feel your horse is going to rush. Spend some time away from the curtain touching him with plastic, bags, or ribbons—anything—although be sure you don’t annoy him. You’re getting him used to the fact that the feel of such things isn’t dangerous.

 

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Vanessa Bee, Founder of the International Horse Agility Club, is touring North America in May and June 2013! Check out the International Horse Agility Club website for details. Here’s a current list of scheduled events.

USA

17th-19 May

Horse Agility Training Sessions and Mini Competitions – Colorado with Vanessa Bee

17th May (evening)

Horse Agility Training Evening in Colorado with Vanessa Bee

18th May (evening)

Horse Agility Training Evening in Colorado with Vanessa Bee

25th May

Horse Agility Fun Day in Arizona, USA with Vanessa Bee

26th -27th May

Get Really Good at Horse Agility with Vanessa Bee, Arizona

1st -2nd June

International Horse Agility Clinic in Washington, USA with Vanessa Bee

Canada

7th – 8th June

How to Get Good at Horse Agility with Vanessa Bee

9th – 10th June

How to Get Good at Horse Agility with Vanessa Bee

HorseAgility SetTHE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK and the new HORSE AGILITY DVD are available from the TSB online bookstore.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER NOW

The All-New Horse Agility DVD Is Coming!

theIHACHorse Agility is the hottest and fastest growing international equestrian sport! Based on the same concepts as the ever-popular Dog Agility competitions, Horse Agility offers horse lovers everywhere the opportunity to put all that groundwork they’re doing to good use, in a fun, active competitive sport. Beginning on a lead rope and progressing to working through and over obstacles “free,” or at liberty, Horse Agility engages the horse in an activity that helps him think and problem-solve while enjoying his training time—step away from all those repetitive longe and roundpen circles! Plus, Horse Agility is appropriate for people of any age or size, and allows those who may not want to ride to spend time with other like-minded individuals in an exciting setting.

HAwDVDNow, as a follow-up to her bestselling book THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK: A STEP-BY-STEP INTRODUCTION TO THE SPORT, founder of the International Horse Agility Club Vanessa Bee brings us an all-new DVD. HORSE AGILITY—THE DVD provides the same sport fundamentals as THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK, but with “real-time” action and visuals to help you further grasp the basic concepts and skills you and your horse need to get started, and get good!

Check out this video introduction to HORSE AGILITY—THE DVD:

HORSE AGILITY—THE DVD will be shipping February 1, 2013. You can preorder your copy now at the TSB online bookstore.

CLICK HERE TO PREORDER NOW

Hey! Did you know that the International Horse Agility Club is a finalist in the Equestrian Social Media Awards? CLICK HERE to check out the Club’s website and then please cast your vote for Best Equestrian Social Network!

CLICK HERE TO VOTE FOR THE INTERNATIONAL HORSE AGILITY CLUB!

CLICK HERE TO VOTE FOR THE INTERNATIONAL HORSE AGILITY CLUB!

There’s Still Time! Sign Up to Be Part of the Horse Agility Summer of Sport Challenge by June 25th!

YOU AND YOUR HORSE can become world champions in Horse Agility! YOU AND YOUR HORSE can compete for your country to win medals and fabulous prizes and competitions for every level!

The International Horse Agility Club presents the 2012 Summer of Sport Challenge via the IHAC’s popular online video competition, allowing horses and handlers from around the globe to compete against each other…without leaving home!

Here’s how the competition works:

In June and July 2012 the IHAC is giving you the opportunity to compete against other teams from around the world for a chance to represent your country in the Horse Agility Summer of Sport World Championship Finals held in July. June 2012 is a qualifying month in which ten qualifying classes can be entered by competitors. The two highest scoring teams (combinations of horse and handler) from each country, in each class, will qualify for the Finals in July.

THERE’S STILL TIME TO ENTER! Sign up at the IHAC website before June 25 to be eligible for the Horse Agility Summer of Sport Challenge Finals and great prizes!

CLICK HERE for more information.

The International Horse Agility Club was founded by TSB author Vanessa Bee whose HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK was released earlier this year and became an instant hit. Horse people everywhere have long wanted an equestrian sport that provides a social and competitive atmosphere, while not requiring riding. Horse Agility, the industry’s newest sport, gives horses and handlers a wonderful way to spend constructive time together, in the arena and out.

THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK is available from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is always FREE. Blog Bonus!!! Enter the coupon code TSBBLOG15 at checkout and receive 15% off your entire order!

CLICK HERE TO ORDER YOUR COPY OF THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK TODAY

TSB Talks to International Horse Agility Club Founder Vanessa Bee about Equestrian “Street Sports,” My Friend Flicka, and Olympic Dreams

The official book of the International Horse Agility Club is available from the TSB online bookstore http://www.HorseandRiderBooks.com.

This month TSB caught up with Vanessa Bee, founder of the International Horse Agility Club (www.thehorseagilityclub.com), and asked her about the inspiration behind the sport and its future. You may have seen the excerpt from Vanessa’s brand new book THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK in the January issue of EQUUS Magazine. It seems everyone is talking about this exciting new horse sport and where it could lead–Vanessa is thinking big! She dreams of international Horse Agility competition and one day, the Olympics!

THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK is the official book of the International Horse Agility Club, and it is available for PREORDER this month from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is always FREE.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK TODAY.

TSB:  Can you tell us about how you came up with the idea for the International Horse Agility Club?

VB: I was teaching a frightened young girl and her big frightened horse and suddenly realized all they had to focus on was their fear. So I set up a little obstacle course and gave them a job to do. Very quickly not only were they too busy negotiating the obstacles to be afraid but ALSO they had gathered an audience!

A thought popped in to my head: “I wonder if there’s a competitive sport like dog agility for horses?” I asked myself. I came home, searched on the Internet and there was NOTHING! That was on the 13th of December, 2009, and the rest is history!

 

TSB: You have a fabulous website featuring an international online video competition. Can you tell us a little about the OLHA Video League, how it works, and how popular it is proving?

VB: I had the idea for online competitions because we were getting a lot of interest from some quite remote places in the world. These people would never be able to ship their horses thousands of miles to the competitions that were currently available, so I decided we’d run an online video competition. I have been staggered by the popularity!

Every month I design a course for each of the four levels of Horse Agility. People build the simple courses in their garden, backyard, field, or arena and practice until they are the best they can be.

Then they get someone to video them going round the course. That video is then posted online for me to judge at the end of the month. It’s very simple and it means that anyone, anywhere can join in the fun and be part of this wonderful global community.

I judge entries from the Outback deserts of Australia, the paddy fields of Taiwan, the grandeur of North America, and the snows of Scandinavia. It’s a great way to “see the world”!

TSB: You explain in your new book THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK the idea of “Wild Agility,” which takes you out of the arena and cross-country. Do you see Wild Agility becoming competitive, much like the cross-country leg of eventing?

VB: Yes I do! I would like to have a three phase event with “dressage” on the ground (perhaps to music!), an obstacle course in an enclosed space, then the “cross-country” phase or “Wild Agility,”—although I might have to get a bit fitter to do that bit!

TSB:  What do you see in the future for the sport of Horse Agility and the International Horse Agility Club?

VB: In the far future I see Horse Agility becoming as popular as dog agility. I see Horse Agility as valid as any equestrian sport with the added bonus that it’s affordable and anyone can do it. That is how I would like it to be.

Consider the sport of football/soccer (the most popular sport in the world): Kids of any financial and cultural background can play it. It’s cheap, it’s easy for them to set up a couple of goal posts and kick a ball around. Now consider most horse sports: They are expensive, you need to be physically fit, and you need to have the means to move your horse around via horsebox or trailer.

I want Horse Agility to become a “street sport”—something anyone who loves horses can become involved in. You don’t even need to own a horse to compete and participate…just borrow one and get involved!

TSB: If you were trapped on a desert island with a horse and a book, what breed of horse would it be and which book would you choose?

VB: I like all horses—I am not breed-specific, but I do love my Exmoor ponies…so it would have to be an Exmoor. They are so hardy they can live anywhere…so they’d be fine on a desert island.

You will think I’m making this up but the book I would take is My Friend Flicka. I first read it when I was 10 years old and I still read it at least once a year. I get totally lost in it and always cry at the end, even though I know what’s going to happen!

TSB: What’s in your refrigerator at all times?

VB: Champagne, I’m always celebrating!

TSB: What is your idea of perfect happiness?

VB: Lying in my horses’ field on a hot summer’s day listening to the horses grazing round me.

TSB: Tell us about the first time you remember sitting on a horse.

VB: I was two-and-half. The horse was called Silver, and he was 16.2hh and dark gray. The owner made him trot—I was completely terrified but immediately hooked!

TSB: Tell us about the first time you remember falling off a horse.

VB: I must have fallen off before this first memory, but I remember being 10 and on my cousin’s farm in the Blue Mountains in Australia. We were trying to get her pony to canter so broke a stick off a bush and gave her a tap on the shoulder. She bucked me off and I learned a valuable lesson!

TSB: What is the quality you most like in a friend?

VB: Honesty.

TSB: What is the quality you most like in a horse?

VB: Honesty. The feedback given by a horse has no agenda…and sometimes that’s hard to take! Horses always tell you the absolute truth.

TSB: If you could do one thing on horseback or with a horse that you haven’t yet done, what would it be?

VB: I would love to fly! A horse with huge wings would be just so fabulous! Can you imagine the sound of those wings moving through the air?

Okay, dream over!

I would like to enter the Olympic stadium with a horse freely moving beside me as I lead the Horse Agility Teams from every country in the world to the competition arena. No bits, no saddles, no whips—just horses and humans in harmony.

TSB: What is your idea of the perfect meal?

VB: Good bread, good cheese, fine wine, good company.

TSB: What is your idea of the perfect vacation?

VB: Riding through African Savannah looking for cheetah!

TSB: If you could have a conversation with one famous person, alive or dead, who would it be?

VB: Gandhi. He didn’t say much but what he said was worth hearing.

TSB: What is your motto?

VB: LIVE!

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EQUUS Magazine Features THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK in the January 2012 Issue

Check out the excerpt in the January 2012 issue of EQUUS Magazine from our forthcoming book THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK: A STEP-BY-STEP INTRODUCTION TO THE SPORT by Vanessa Bee, Founder of the International Horse Agility Club.

Vanessa is busy spreading the new sport of Horse Agility around the globe. Have you ever watched a Dog Agility class? The handlers have fun, the dogs have fun, and there is no need for prods, restraints, or bribes….now, you can have the same experience with your horse! Learn to work your horse over a course of obstacles, in hand or at liberty, then set up “play days,” official competitions, or register to compete against an international field online!

Learn more about Horse Agility and the International Horse Agility Club in the January 2012 issue of EQUUS Magazine, found wherever quality equestrian magazines are sold.

And preorder your copy of THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK at the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is always FREE.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK NOW.

Online Horse Agility? Oh YEAH, This Is Gonna Be FUN!

The International Horse Agility Club is gaining momentum and finding innovative ways to allow horse lovers worldwide to participate in this exciting new sport. Now you can compete against other Horse Agility enthusiasts ONLINE! That’s right, the OLHA (Online Horse Agility) is a monthly video competition and league.

Simply join the International Horse Agility Club and download each month’s course for FREE. Construct it to the best of your ability, practice practice practice, and have a friend video you and your horse having the time of your life! Videos are then submitted and judged, and points and prizes awarded. How cool—and easy—is that?

Don’t forget…if you haven’t started a horse agility club in your area, you might be missing out on a chance to catch this wild ride on its way to the top! Check out Horse Agility Club USA to find accredited trainers and information about hosting training days and competitions (in real time) in a town near you.

PRE-ORDER THE HORSE AGILITY HANDBOOK: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO THE SPORT by Vanessa Bee, the founder of the International Horse Agility Club, at the TSB bookstore TODAY!

TSB is offering a chance to win $100 gift certificate toward books and DVDs on our website! Sign up at the TSB bookstore (look for the banner at the bottom of the page) or on our Facebook page.