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Posts Tagged ‘Sean Patrick’

GetitRight

Guess what? There have been thousands of times our horses have tried to answer our requests, maybe in several “not-quite-right” ways, but then because of the way we reacted to those small mistakes, they “got spooked”…and then suddenly “not-quite-right” became “oh-so-wrong.”

In his bestselling book THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE, Florida-based trainer Sean Patrick explains that Avoidance Behavior is the defense mechanism your horse uses when a situation occurs that is unpleasant (such as water spraying in his ears) or scary (such as being approached with a noisy garbage bag).

“The horse looks for a way to avoid the stimulus or get rid of it,” says Sean.

This can mean he tries to run away, shy, buck, back, or rear. The goal for all of us is to learn the difference between the horse seeking a release point (the moment of “success” when the horse “gets” what you are asking and when the removal of any stimulus should instantly occur), and the horse that is overreacting and trying to avoid the situation altogether.

When approaching your horse with a stimulus, give him a chance to seek, and find, the right answer.

When approaching your horse with a stimulus, give him a chance to seek, and find, the right answer.

 

To begin to learn to recognize Avoidance Behavior and how to deal with it, let’s look at a few common examples and possible causes provided by Sean in his book:

 

Avoidance Behavior: The horse bolts away from you as you lift your dressage whip.

Possible Causes: 1) Previous application of the whip has been unfair—for example, the release has not been given at the right moment, or the whip has been used too firmly; 2) The horse does not understand that the whip is not something to fear but to calmly respond to.

 

Avoidance Behavior: The horse moves his head away from your moving hand, anticipating contact.

Possible Causes: 1) The horse is justified in believing that he may be struck by that moving hand and is preparing to get out of the way; 2) The horse has not had enough physical contact to know that he can trust your moving hands.

 

Avoidance Behavior: The horse takes off running with you on his back, becoming inattentive to your cues.

Possible Causes: 1) The horse is growing frustrated with your leg pressure, as a release does not seem to come, no matter how he responds; 2) The horse is being ridden in a place where his fear level has been raised until it is too much for him to handle, such as in an indoor arena on a windy day.

 

Avoidance Behavior: The horse begins to buck violently while you are riding and is not responding to any form of cue.

Possible Causes: 1) The horse is not used to having a rider on his back and bucks out of discomfort or fear; 2) The horse is startled by or unhappy with your use of leg pressure.

 

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

Sean says that of course not all Avoidance Behavior is caused by improper handling. We should also note that a horse that has not had time to build trust in his human handlers and gain experience in that partnership will be more inclined to show it. We can all help our horses develop in ways that ensure Avoidance Behavior appears less and less often through conscious attention to our own use of techniques and our position around the horse and in the saddle; through thoughtful teaching; and by always being aware that scenarios such as these may not help our horses learn. It is our goal to help our horses learn in ways that make their lives safe, purposeful, and happy. And Rule #1 should be to give them a chance to get it right.

Discover more training insight, as well as Sean Patrick’s 33 steps to horse training, in THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE, available now from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is FREE.

CLICK HERE for more information or to order.

 

Trafalgar Square Books, the leading publisher of equestrian books and DVDs, is a small business based on a farm in rural Vermont.

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Only a few miles from the beach in Florida is not a bad place to be in January.

Throw in a unique opportunity to learn from and spend time with three top trainers and Road to the Horse alumni as they work with young and developing riding prospects, and you’ve got yourself a really good time!

Join your fellow sun-, fun-, and horselovers at the spacious and well-appointed Pioneer Trail Reserve in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, January 2-4, 2015. Host and TSB author Sean Patrick (2014 and 2015 RTTH Wild Card Contestant) welcomes Jim Anderson, reigning champion and overall winner of the 2014 RTTH competition, and Mary Kitzmiller, winner of over $55,000 in the Extreme Mustang Makeover events and the only woman to have been chosen to compete at the Road to the Horse’s Wild Card Competition in both 2014 and 2015, to his fabulous facility.

 

Pioneer Trail Reserve is a spacious and well-appointed equestrian facility, with a large covered arena and luxurious clubhouse.

Pioneer Trail Reserve is a spacious and well-appointed equestrian facility, with a large covered arena and luxurious clubhouse.

 

Sean, Jim, and Mary will provide in-depth instruction, explanations of their techniques, and up-close-and-personal insight over the course of 18 teaching sessions, featuring colt-starting, preliminary under-saddle work, and more advanced training and maneuvers. Symposium attendees are provided refreshments and a fully catered lunch each day at no additional cost. In addition, separate tickets are available for a VIP dinner on Saturday night, where guests can relax, interact with each other and all three clinicians, and enjoy live music and delicious meal in a beautiful ranch setting.

We caught up with Sean last week and asked him to tell us a little about the event and how it was conceived:

 

TSB: How did you, Mary, and Jim all meet?

Sean: At Road to the Horse 2014, there were eight of us selected to be competitors in the new “Wild Card” part of the event. It was such a nice group of individuals, we all quickly became friends. I’m originally from Canada, Jim is Canadian, and Mary desperately wishes she was, so we had that in common!

 

TSB: When did you conceive of the idea to hold the symposium? How did you come up with the name Three Amigos?

Sean: If I was to design the itinerary of a perfect 3-day clinic, this is it.  I knew Jim was coming down to visit, and Mary had just been to our place for a clinic, so I thought about bringing us all back to the same location and offering a fun, in-depth look at how we each teach horses. I have three colts all needing a start right at that time (January), and this experience will be a wonderful way to get them going. In addition, we all have a gelding from the same ranch (the Four Sixes) and the same group (chosen for last year’s RTTH), so our horses Smokey, Guthrie, and Jack all know each other well.  There will be three sets of “Three Amigos”!

 

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TSB: What does each clinician bring to the table that is unique and/or different?

Sean: Jim is so well schooled by many top horsemen. He’s quite humble, so you won’t always hear about that part. His ability to handle and teach horses is first-class. His 2014 Road to the Horse world championship is proof of his abilities.

Mary has very different experiences than Jim and me. She has also ridden with top horsemen, but has spent time with a lot of tough horses and built her program around that. She’s a student of the bridle horse, gifted in gentling horses, amazing at teaching tricks, and an excellent cow-horse hand.

Then there’s me—I’m just along for the ride!

[Ed. note: Sean’s just being modest…he’s the author of the bestselling book THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE and the DVD set by the same name. Check them out and see what’s so special about this guy!]

 

TSB: Tell us a little bit about how symposium attendees will spend their day, and what you feel they will take away that they can apply to their own evolution as horsemen/women.

Sean: The round pen will be set up for the benefit of the three youngsters. Each trainer will spend one hour with each colt, on each day. Since we have three different horses, and trainers, the development of each style with each colt will be different. This is ideal for seeing how we all approach our plan. In the afternoon, topic-based teaching sessions will begin with the three-year-old geldings. The attendees are able to sit closely on the bleachers, ask questions, chat with trainers as they work, mingle with other industry experts, and spend time by the fire with them in the evenings. There is also a VIP dinner with all the trainers on Saturday night. We are encouraging a lot of crowd interaction and know the pace will move quickly and keep people learning and entertained.

 

TSB: If you could choose three words to describe the Three Amigos Symposium, what three words would you choose?

Sean: Intimate, enlightening, engaging.

 

TSB: Are all of you returning to RTTH in 2015?

Sean: Jim won the 2014 Wild Card event and then the championship title. He was invited to come back in 2015 to defend his title.  So he will be at 2015 Road to the Horse against Chris Cox and this year’s Wild Card winner.

Mary was a 2014 Wild Card contestant and was invited back for 2015.  I was also a 2014 Wild Card contestant, and like Mary, invited back to compete again.

So all three of us are heading back to RTTH in one way or another…it’ll be hopefully Mary or I who compete against Jim in the finals!

 

Don’t miss your chance to walk the beach in your boots and start your New Year with new insight into horses, starting them, and taking them that next step! Tickets for the 2014 Three Amigos Symposium and VIP dinner are on sale now CLICK HERE.

 

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Airports near the New Smyrna Beach Pioneer Trail Reserve facility include Orlando (MCO) and Daytona Beach (DAB ). Hotel accommodations have been arranged nearby at the new “Hotel of Choice” Country Inn and Suites (with a special nightly “Three Amigos” rate of $69.00), and there are beachfront options for the family on the Atlantic’s beautiful New Smyrna Beach, as well! It is an easy drive to/from Daytona Beach, Disney World, Sea World, and many other major Florida attractions, so it’s no problem to make this a family “post-holiday” vacation, while you slip away each day to work with and witness the best in the horse industry!

 

A portion of the Three Amigos Symposium proceeds will be proudly donated to the “Hope Reins” Therapeutic Riding Program based in New Smyrna Beach at Marcody Ranch. For more information on the event or assistance with ticket sales, please contact the “Three Amigos” event coordinator at events@seanpatricktraining.com or 321-693-5551. Media passes are available.

 

Sean Patrick’s THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE book and the DVD SET are available from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is FREE.

CLICK HERE TO SHOP NOW

 

 

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SeanPwithbooks

As you head back to work after (we hope!) a weekend of riding and playing with your horses, Sean Patrick, author of THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE gives us a few tips to get us through the lessons and training sessions we may try fit in between appointments, pick ups, drop offs, and office hours. Here’s his quick-hit list to remind us how to keep our horses safe when tying them, whether in the barn aisle, to the trailer, or out and about in the week ahead.

 

The Do’s and Don’t’s of Tying

DO:

  • Use an unbreakable halter, such as one made of strong rope.
  • Keep your horse in his normal environment and “comfort zone” for the first few dozen tying sessions.
  • Groom and spend time with your horse while he is tied, especially a green horse or one that is a “tying novice.”
  • Tie your horse high and short, and always use a quick-release knot.
  • Expect your horse to tie.
  • Ask him to stand tied often.

 

DON’T:

  • Use a clasp or buckle on your lead rope that could break.
  • Tie to something weak, such as an “O”-ring on a barn wall or fence post.
  • “Help” by untying your horse if you feel he is nervous or lonely when tied.
  • Expect him to tie quietly without proper preparation.
  • Tie where he could catch a leg or step in something unsafe.
  • Ignore the weather and allow him to get chilled or overheated.
  • Leave your green horse unattended.
  • Snub (tie where there is no slack in the lead line).

 

Work hard this week. Be safe in your travels and when handling and riding your horse. Count the hours until the next time you can walk in the barn, call your horse’s name, and swing up into the saddle.

 

THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE by Sean Patrick is available as a BOOK and as an accompanying 4-DVD SET.

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE NOW

 

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TSB author Sean Patrick and his "WildCard" colt "Joker" are headed to the 2014 Road to the Horse competition.

TSB author Sean Patrick and his “WildCard” colt “Joker” are headed to the 2014 Road to the Horse competition.

 

The TSB crew has waited a full year to see how well Sean Patrick, horse trainer and author of THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE book and DVD set, and his “WildCard” colt “Joker” have progressed.

In March of 2013, eight “WildCard” trainers drew playing cards that decided the order in which they would each choose a three-year-old colt from the Road to the Horse 2013 AQHA Remuda from the 6666 Ranch. Sean was one of these trainers, and after drawing the “Joker,” he returned to his home facility in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, with his chosen colt (appropriately dubbed “Joker”).

Sean had one  year to prepare for a test of horsemanship at this year’s Road to the Horse, which will take place March 13-16, in Lexington, Kentucky. If he and Joker win the WildCard competition on Thursday, March 13, then Sean will step into the arena with the other Road to the Horse stars and get a shot at the overall World Championship of Colt Starting title.

“Preparing Joker for the upcoming event confirms the need to cross-train our mounts,” says Sean. “Since the competition includes obstacle, rail work, reining patterns, fireworks, cattle and so forth…he must be ready for anything!”

Check out the amazing progress Sean and Joker have made together over the past year:

 

 

And in the spirit of preparing a horse to handle anything, here are some easy-to-use tips from Sean’s bestselling book THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE:

 

5 Ways to Increase Your Horse’s Handling Time

I like to increase handling time in a variety of ways.  I know that the more I interact with my horse, the more comfortable he will be with me and his surroundings.  Here are a few suggestions:

 

Take a horse “along for the ride” to a show, clinic, or new training facility.  Trainers do this on a regular basis just to introduce inexperienced horses to  new places, sights, and sounds.

Tie your horse while you are working around the barn or ranch, or finishing the chores. I often ask my horses to stand tied in a shady comfortable place while I do my busywork.  I want them to be relaxed enough to do this regularly and have it be part of their daily routine.

If you have more than one horse, tie one close to your riding arena or round pen, wherever you are training, while you work with the other.  This lets him absorb the commotion related to action in the ring that doesn’t involve him, and encourages confidence.

4  Plan a short workout and cooling-down period, tie a horse for a break as you work with another horse or finish chores, then return to your horse and work on something different—perhaps another riding session, some groundwork, or a bath.  Always remember to warm up and cool down, but there is no reason why you cannot lengthen the duration of saddle time with a break in the middle.

5  Lead or “pony” your horse down the trail.  Your horse gets exercised while learning to respond to halter pressure, see new sights, and behave in the company of another horse.

 

Modern-setSean’s bestselling book and DVD set are available from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is FREE.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER THE BOOK

CLICK HERE TO ORDER THE DVD SET

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Halloween2013

 

When you work with or ride horses for long enough, there’s bound to be at least one moment where you find yourself with your heart pounding, your stomach in knots, and all-out fear pulsing through your body.

Scary incidents are an unfortunate byproduct of working with such large, powerful animals. Sometimes, a frightening scenario plays out because of human error. A person (often out of ignorance) may startle a horse or push him too hard or too fast. Horses are our athletic partners, and rider decisions made in training and competition can cause dangerous scenarios to unfold. Sometimes, the horse’s instinct for flight or fight is the source of danger. It does not matter how much you love your horse or how much you think he loves you—the fact remains that horses are hardwired for survival, and they possess teeth, hooves, speed, and size to make that possible.

The good thing is that we can educate ourselves to limit the number of scary incidents and keep riding and working with horses safe. The more we know about the horse and his instincts, the more we respect his power and teach him to respect our presence, the better we are at our chosen discipline, and the more secure our seat, the safer we will be. And, when we feel safe (not scared!) we can have more fun doing what we love to do.

Here’s what Buck Brannaman says about fear and how we can defeat it with knowledge in 7 CLINICS WITH BUCK BRANNAMAN:

 

 

Riding in Real Life: The Runaway

When I was ten years old I went on a hack with my riding instructor. She was on a green training project and I was on an older OTTB mare. I’d ridden since I was five and was a confident kid. I’d also ridden the mare before in lessons.

We crossed the main road and headed up a fairly steep ascent. I don’t really remember how far we had traveled when the mare I was on decided she’d just had enough. She spun, and I stuck on, but then she was off, galloping downhill on a gravel road, faster than I’d ever gone in my life. Sitting here, typing this now, I can feel my heart racing at the memory of it…of how I couldn’t stop her…how I pulled back with all my strength and seesawed the reins, but the mare just pulled back harder and ran faster.

At the time, the only answer I had to the situation was to get off. At the time, hitting the ground hard seemed less scary than plummeting downhill toward a busy road on an out-of-control horse. I’d learned the emergency dismount when I’d started riding and managed some skewed form of it, flinging myself out of the saddle and then rolling, as I remembered being taught, away from my horse’s flying hooves.

I had a helmet on (thankfully). I didn’t break anything (thankfully). I was sprained and bruised and shaken, but other than that I was okay. The mare, too, survived her skidding, sliding navigation across the road and back to the barn, where we found her with lathered chest and heaving sides, reins dangerously looped loose up near her ears.

The tool I had needed when my horse ran away with me, but didn’t have yet, was the “pulley rein” or “one-rein stop.” I needed to know how to redirect my horse’s energy. Sergeant Rick Pelicano, author of BOMBPROOF YOUR HORSE and BETTER THAN BOMBPROOF describes it this way:

 

The Pulley Rein

1  Hold one rein tightly, braced on the neck and grabbing mane if you can.

2  Pull the other rein straight up and toward you.

3  Lean back, push your legs forward, and sit deep in the saddle.

Training Tip: Clinton Anderson has a great One-Rein Stop exercise to help train your horse to immediately stop and soften at any gait when you pick up one rein. Check out CLINTON ANDERSON’S DOWNUNDER HORSEMANSHIP.

 

But what about my instructor? What could she have done in my runaway scenario? Caroline Robbins, Publisher at Trafalgar Square Books, says that some of her scariest experiences riding were out on the trail with others, watching as a horse bolted and took off, and not knowing what to do or how to help.

Sean Patrick, author of THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE and one of this year’s Road to the Horse Wild Card Contestants, began his career as a high-country guide in the rugged mountains of British Columbia. I asked him about his experiences in groups and what onlookers should do when a fellow rider is in trouble.

 

Sean says:

1  Avoid reacting yourself. When a horse is pulling a tree out of the ground, jumping sideways or bolting off, remain still and quiet. When a handler rushes toward a reacting horse or yells, “Whoa!” the result is rarely helpful. A runaway does not need another horse to run behind it as well. The fleeing reaction might continue.

2  When in the saddle, the sound of thundering hooves can initiate a startle reflex with your own mount. When you feel this anxiety building, it might be best to simply take one rein and turn your horse to face the opposite direction. A well-trained mount will be able to stand quietly, but a more-novice horse may feel influenced by the other horse’s fear.

3  When a group is together in a pasture, and one rider is having great trouble, there is very little to do except keep yourself safe. This way the runaway horse is more likely to relax, slow down, and come back to the group. If a fall happens, at least you will be in control and able to come to the rider’s aid. When in such situations, I’ve learned to sit quietly and respond after it’s over.

 

Horses can bring us joy, peace, companionship with other people and other creatures, and they can bring us closer to the land that surrounds us. As long as we keep learning and strive to better understand the horse and react in more appropriate ways to his own reactions, as long as we seek instruction from others with more experience so we are prepared to handle whatever happens in the saddle, then we are on our way to keeping the “scared” out of riding and working with horses, and the joy in it.

Stay safe. Have fun. Happy Halloween

–Rebecca Didier, Senior Editor

 

All the books and DVDs mentioned in this post are available from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is always FREE.

CLICK HERE TO SHOP NOW

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TSB author Sean Patrick and his Road to the Horse Wild Card colt Joker.

TSB author Sean Patrick and his Road to the Horse Wild Card colt Joker.

In March of 2013, Sean Patrick, author of THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE BOOK and DVD was chosen as a Wild Card Contestant in the Road to the Horse colt-starting competition. Sean took home an untouched Quarter Horse range colt named Remember Pick, with a year for the two to work together before returning to Kentucky in 2014 to show off what they’d taught each other.

“Since I drew the joker card during the event, I was able to pick from the remuda,” says Sean. “My wife Alisha’s words rang in my ears…’Number 6 is the one I’d go with.’ ‘Joker’ and I have been best buds since…We are having a blast!”

If you are anywhere near Florida, there’s a great upcoming opportunity to meet Sean and Joker when Sean and Alisha host a FREE “Balanced Riding” Clinic on August 3, 2013.

Join Sean at his fabulous training facility in New Smyrna, Florida, on August 3 for a FREE clinic!

Join Sean at his fabulous training facility in New Smyrna, Florida, on August 3 for a FREE clinic!

“We will set up two round pens and have the Balanced Rider machine to play with,” explains Sean. “The Balance Rider is non-motorized mechanical apparatus that responds to the balance–and imbalance of its rider. The barrel shaped seat, like the bare back of a horse, provides an effective means of learning to balance in the saddle.”

The first 12 riders who sign up for the FREE Balanced Riding Clinic can bring a horse along! All others are welcome to join on foot, take part in exercising on the Balance Rider machine, audit the equitation lessons, have a chance to win great door prizes, plus enjoy a nice lunch with the group.

“We want anyone interested in learning to be a more balanced rider to have a wonderful day at Pioneer Trail Reserve in New Smyrna Beach, Florida,” says Sean. “Everyone interested in attending, including auditors, should RSVP as soon as possible.”

RSVP for the FREE clinic by emailing sean@seanpatricktraining.com.

 

Click image to order the complete Sean Patrick set!

Click image to order the complete Sean Patrick set!

THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE, called “a top-down, all-inclusive trip to the ultimate working, performance, or pleasure ride” by Dr. Robert Miller, the father of Imprint Training, is available from the TSB online bookstore.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER SEAN’S BESTSELLING BOOK

CLICK HERE TO ORDER THE 4-DISC DVD SET

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great quotes image

Sometimes we make a real change in our habits, our lifestyle, the way we think or act, just because we heard someone say something or read a few lines somewhere that stuck with us. Whether four words or twenty-four, whether plain-spoken or clever, the best lessons from the best teachers fall like rain in monsoon season—at predictable times, sometimes pleasantly and gently, while others in a soaking deluge.

The horse world is filled with great teachers—those who are wordsmiths and those who cut to the chase; those who nurture and those who suffer no fools—and perhaps our most important lesson is that we can learn something from all of them.

Here are 10 great quotes from some of the amazingly talented, motivated, and successful riders, trainers, and equine experts who TSB is lucky to call their authors—a little something to do on a rainy day.

1  PHILLIP DUTTON, 12-Time USEA Leading Rider of the Year and 5-Time Olympian with Two Gold Medals

“The general thought now is, or should be, that there is always another day! The rider should understand that sometimes, more training for your horse is necessary, and retiring [pulling up/changing a lesson] before more damage is done is a much better course of action than pushing your and your horse’s limits.”

From MODERN EVENTING WITH PHILLIP DUTTON

2  LINDA TELLINGTON-JONES, Founder of the Tellington Method Approach to Training and Communicating

“I feel strongly that the tenets of classical riding are imperative and pure, and there is no moving forward without conscientious attention paid to all that has been learned and proven in horsemanship’s past. However, move forward we must, with the intent of achieving something better in the decades ahead and a common goal of alleviating the prevalence of pain, anxiety, and depression in the wonderful, talented sport horses with whom we are so lucky to pursue our dreams.”

From DRESSAGE WITH MIND, BODY & SOUL

3  BUCK BRANNAMAN, Renowned Horseman and Clinician

“Working horses is a little like being married. Sometimes you need to adjust and change your plan.”

From 7 CLINICS WITH BUCK BRANNAMAN

4  DOUGLAS PUTERBAUGH, Dressage Trainer and Clinician

“Centered riders understand the harmonious relationship between knowledge and achievement. They’re active participants in their own education, reading the writings of the masters, observing other riders, and seizing opportunities to train with someone good.”

From THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS OF DRESSAGE

5  CLINTON ANDERSON, Internationally Recognized Horseman and Clinician

“Horsemanship should be fun. By learning how to control your horse in any situation, your confidence will greatly increase. When you’re confident, you can relax and enjoy your partnership.”

From PHILOSOPHY

6  DENNY EMERSON, USEA Hall of Fame Inductee and “One of the 50 Most Influential Horseman of the 20th Century”

“The only thing that each of us can guarantee is that we are prepared to take advantage of opportunities if they happen to come our way. Even when opportunity doesn’t drop out of the sky into our lap, we still need to be ready. In other words, the preparedness part is up to us.”

From HOW GOOD RIDERS GET GOOD

7  KERRY THOMAS, Pioneering Researcher in Equine Athletic Psychology and Founder of the Thomas Herding Technique

“As equine caretakers, it is our responsibility to understand how the domestic environment affects the horse on all levels—physical and mental. As a social animal, the horse depends on daily interaction for mental growth. Striking a balance between the physical environment and the emotional requirement of the horse to survive within that environment is essential.”

From HORSE PROFILING

8 PAUL BELASIK, Rider, Trainer, Author, and Proponent of Classical Equestrian Ideals

“You can watch wild horses for a whole day and nothing astounding may happen. They graze, they drink, they seem to meander without obvious direction. It is all subtlety….When we do it right, there won’t be much drama. You learn to increase your attention and you train your mind to let more information to you….You learn to have more patience, you learn to watch, and you learn to let it come to you. To train horses well you have to learn to observe subtleties.”

From NATURE, NURTURE AND HORSES

9  SEAN PATRICK, Horseman and Clinician

“Never assume a horse remembers anything from one day to the next. Check his responses and use previous lessons as warm-up exercises before trying to advance to something new.”

From THE MODERN HORSEMAN’S COUNTDOWN TO BROKE

10 FREDERIC PIGNON and MAGALI DELGADO, Renowned Trainers and the Original Stars of Cavalia

“We all make mistakes and by doing so we discover something about our limitations, but if someone or some horse suffers from these mistakes, then we must do our utmost not to repeat them. May every rider strive for a better connection with his or her horse by observation, closer understanding, and patient groundwork. It matters not what discipline is pursued, only that there be a perfectly balanced union between the two—man and horse—so the two become one.”

From GALLOP TO FREEDOM

All these books and DVDs, and many more, are available from the TSB online bookstore.

CLICK HERE TO VISIT OUR BOOKSTORE

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