Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Friesians’

It is always amazing to learn how our authors manage their days. With most of them working equestrians or equine experts, hours are always an incredible juggling act of horses, clients, and family. This month we caught up with the stunning and talented Sandra Beaulieu, author of FREESTYLE: The Ultimate Guide to Riding, Training, and Competing to Music, to find out how her life balance works as the manager of Little River Friesians in Havana, Florida.

Photo by Susan McClafferty

5:00 am A few years ago I started waking up early to work on my book FREESTYLE. I love the dark and quiet nature of the morning…with my two cups of coffee of course! Don’t get me wrong…I would love to sleep in, but if I don’t work in the morning it just won’t happen. To help me stay consistent I put my cell phone outside my room so I have to get up to turn off the alarm, otherwise I will hit snooze. I am currently working on an ebook specifically for Second Level choreography, which is a supplement to my book FREESTYLE. I also work on blog posts, social media…basically anything that involves my computer.

Coffee and working on the latest eBook. Photo by Sandra Beaulieu.

6:00 am Light yoga and any physical therapy exercises I am working on. I have old riding injuries and a chronic hip flexor issue that takes a lot to maintain. I go to the chiropractor and a masseuse once a week and also use my Magna Wave machine, KT tape sometimes, and Arnica to help improve healing and symmetry in my body. If I ride too many horses in one day or a very wide horse it puts a lot of stress on my body so I do my best to stay flexible and strong.

7:00 am Down the stairs and into the barn…I live in a beautiful apartment above the horses and I love being so close to them. I have quick access in case of emergencies, and it makes my day to hear them whinny when it’s time for carrots. There have been many nights where I need to give medications, bring in a loose horse, or check on a pregnant mare. I help with morning chores and make sure everyone is safe, happy, and healthy.

A beautiful morning bringing in the horses at Little River Friesians in Havana, Florida.

8:00 am – 11:00 am Run back upstairs to make my morning smoothie and take my supplements. Then back downstairs to write out my plan for the day and powwow with Lilian, our barn manager. Every day is different but most of the time I plan to ride two or three horses by lunch. Once a week we plan a trail day where the horses get to venture out and have a relaxing stroll through the woods. Sometimes I am preparing for a clinic, performance, or photo shoot. 

I work on basic dressage training with all the riding horses and add liberty and trick training as well. Lately, I have added some working equitation obstacles and introduced some of the horses to the garrocha pole. I like to keep training sessions fun with a lot of variety. I always play music and have individual playlists for each horse to work on future Freestyles and to keep the energy light and playful. 

Riding Co Fan S at a dressage clinic. He is a thirteen-year-old Friesian gelding owned by Little River Friesians. Photo by Triple C Photography

11:00 am – 12:00 pm  Lunch time for me and the horses. I help the team give out hay, water, and extra supplements/medications. I usually check the social media channels for Little River Friesians while I eat and Lilian and I meet to work on TikTok videos and post to Instagram/Facebook. We love creating beautiful and funny videos of the horses to share with the world. We have mostly Friesians at the farm along with a few Warlanders (Friesian x Andalusian cross) and Andalusians. They are certainly fairytale horses with wonderful personalities that love to entertain.

Preparing Co Fan S for a funny TikTok video. Photo by Rachel Quidagno

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Back to the horses! We have quite a few broodmares that I work with, doing long-lining, easy trail riding, and sometimes ring work. My main priority is to keep them happy and healthy so that they are in the best shape possible for carrying their foals. This includes a lot of grooming time, bathing/braiding, and some trick training for fun. Lilian and I also work together to train the foals/yearlings so that they are well-handled when they are sold. All our weanlings lead very well, stand for the farrier, get baths, and are introduced to the trailer and the round pen before they move on to new homes. 

The “Model” Friesian mares at Little River Friesians: (left to right) Truus Van Het Houkumhuis, Trudi, Trude Van De Kleine Koppel, Sybrich V. Stal Staf Karima. Photo by Kimberly Chason

3:00 pm “Dinner time” is fairly early so the horses can go outside and spend most of their time grazing and out with each other. In the summer months they stay inside under the fans until later in the evening but right now the weather is perfect to be outside from 3:00 pm in the afternoon until 7:00 am the next day. 

4:00 pm This is usually my time to work with Rovandio, my personal horse. Right now we are learning how to do Working Equitation and having fun preparing for shows/clinics. Rovandio is nineteen years old and requires a lot of maintenance so while I am grooming him he has the Magna Wave on him, his nebulizer for breathing, and I give him his homeopathic remedies, arnica, and herbal cough syrup before we ride. We usually do a short walking trail ride to warm up and work on dressage and obstacles, depending on how he feels that day.

I have known Rovandio since he was born and owned by my close friend Bethanne Ragaglia. When he was older I started training him full time and taking him to perform with my horse Douwe. He is a handy horse, easy to ride with one hand, and has a comfortable stride. I started painting from horseback with Rovandio, and we have performed at Equine Affaire and were invited to the World Equestrian Games and Equitana as well.

Painting from horseback while riding Rovandio, a Lipizzan/Andalusian/TB cross gelding. Photo by Kimberly Chason

7:00 am Usually I try to catch up on my own social media channels at this time and make sure to include my sponsors, Adams Horse Supplies, Espana Silk, and Kastel Denmark. I check to see if Little River has any comments/messages and return emails as well. 

Before I have dinner I enjoy taking the four-wheeler out to the horse’s paddocks to give them carrots and check that their fly masks/sheets/blankets are on properly and that everyone looks happy and healthy. During this nightly drive I stop by the beautiful meadow where my heart horse Douwe is buried and say goodnight to my special boy. He tragically passed away last summer due to a ruptured spleen and the past year has been a difficult time for me to grieve and figure out my life without him. 

My heart horse Douwe was a lot of fun in photo shoots. We used to perform a lot together, blending bridleless riding, liberty, and tricks. Photo by Kimberly Chason

8:00 pm Wind down from the day with a healthy salad, sometimes a glass of wine, and an episode of whatever I have been watching recently. I like to watch familiar shows I have seen before…if I watch something new and exciting I just want to stay up all night to see what happens! I love watching shows and movies that have horses and beautiful costumes like Game of Thrones, Outlander, and Bridgerton. Sometimes I think I was born in the wrong time period!

With Douwe, the Friesian gelding that changed my life. Photo/art by Kimberly Chason

9:00 pm My goal is to be in bed by this time, and I usually write in my journal before I turn the lights out, reflecting on my day and appreciating all the positive things in my life. I look forward to the future but do my best to stay present, enjoying my dream job surrounded by the beautiful, special horses of Little River Friesians.


Sandra Beaulieu’s book FREESTYLE is available from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is FREE.

CLICK HERE for more information or to order.

Enjoy this? Check out other author interviews in the “24 Hours” series:

Dr. Stacie Boswell
Cathy Woods
Dr. Jenni Grimmett
Dr. Bob Grisel
Tik Maynard
Jec Aristotle Ballou
Kendra Gale
Jean Abernethy
Yvonne Barteau
Jonathan Field
Emma Ford
Jochen Schleese
Heather Smith Thomas
Lynn Palm
Daniel Stewart
Doug Payne
Janet Foy




Trafalgar Square Books, the leading publisher of equestrian books and videos, is a small business based on a farm in rural Vermont.

Read Full Post »

BLThere

In 2009, TSB released GALLOP TO FREEDOM, the first book from the extraordinary French horse trainers Frédéric Pignon and Magali Delgado. Frédéric and Magali were the original stars of the hit traveling show Cavalia, with which the couple toured beginning in 2003 when the Cirque-du-Soleil-like performance—with horses—first took North America by storm. Over six years Frédéric, Magali, and their cast of beautiful stallions performed before more than two million spectators in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Now, five years after we published their first book, the fabulous follow-up is available. In BUILDING A LIFE TOGETHER–YOU AND YOUR HORSE, Frédéric and Magali offer a series of practical and ethical guideposts to help build an honest, open, happy life with horses. Hundreds of emotionally charged photographs by internationally renowned photographer Gabriele Boiselle provide deliciously enlightening glimpses into the kind of relationships we all dream of having with our horses, and with each other.

In celebration of their second book on horses and horsemanship, here is a look back at part of writer Elizabeth McCall’s 2009 interview with Frédéric and Magali:

 

Q: You dedicated your book GALLOP TO FREEDOM to Dao and Templado, two of your world-famous Lusitano stallions. Describe what each horse contributed to your philosophy.

M: For me, Dao opened a door to encourage me to work deeply on the mind and on the body of the horse. It was like a revelation every day I was riding him. It was like, “Uh-oh, there is another way to work. Open your mind. Open your senses.” Dao showed me that.

F: When I started to work with Templado I understood that he was very special. He was one of those horses who makes you understand that every horse is very unique. There is no rule. There are no mathematical ways to understand a horse. Templado was a unique personality. He was not like the hundreds of horses I worked with before, and he made me understand that when we work with a horse, we have to adapt ourselves and even adapt everything we’ve learned [before] to this new unique personality. He taught us a lot, but the way he opened my mind…about working with a new horse using all we know and trying to learn more. When you work with a horse, I think it’s important to realize that he could probably teach you much more than you already know.

 

Frederic, Magali, and Dao on the beach in Malibu, California.

Frederic, Magali, and Dao on the beach in Malibu, California.

 

Q for M: There are some incredible shots of you on the beach in Malibu, California, in the book. You were galloping Dao without a bridle in Paradise
Cove! Were you sure he would stop?

M: At the beginning, I was feeling like he could gallop all the way to Los Angeles and we would both be happy. (Laughs) Both of us we were so excited. It was such a special feeling to be free with him on the beach, I didn’t care if he was running fast and I don’t think he cared either. You know that feeling—the horse starts to run and you don’t want him to stop. It’s a magical moment in your life. We did a lot of cantering on the beach that day.

Q for F: The book has photos of your two Friesian stallions Phoebus and Paulus when they first arrived on tour [with Cavalia] at one-and-a-half years old. It also shows them all grown up, performing at liberty. How did you train them on tour, along with performing, rehearsing, moving from city to city, and everything else?

F: That was the difficult part of having young horses on tour. It was a work in progress. It was interesting to let them learn how it works with
music and a show, but sometimes they were like two Friesian teenagers. That’s why now, I’m enjoying the time I can spend with them. It’s much
easier, but they had good experience [on tour] and now they are very professional.

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Q: You always look cool and calm in photos where you’re performing. Don’t you ever get nervous when you’re going on the stage with a horse for
the first time or competing?

M: For me it’s not nerves. I’m really excited. When I have a new horse, I’m always really excited by the results of my horse in the show and to see the reactions of the people. For me, it’s like a positive energy, but I know it’s not the same way for everybody. I’m lucky. I’ve been in shows since I was very young and I know myself very well. I need that little point of excitement inside when my heart is going boom, boom! (Laughs) But I’m not afraid and I’m not tense. I’m just very focused, concentrating, and full of energy and that has helped me a lot for the competition and for the show.

Q: So that helps the horse stay calm and focused too?

M: Yes, it’s like in my mind and my body I tell the horse, “OK, relax.” I speak a lot through my body.

Q for F: How do you deal with pressure situations, like when you’ve got five loose stallions to control?

F: You have to first work on your own stress. It’s why I do yoga. We have to first control ourselves and our emotions. If you can control yourself, then you can help the horses.

Q: What do you hope that people will realize about horses after they read your book?

M: I just hope that we can help people to look at their horses differently, to think their horses can understand. I hope the stories, from Dao to Mandarin to Templado, open people’s minds. Maybe if your horse is reacting he has pain, or he needs more attention. Look in his eyes and try to come back to a natural feeling. Don’t get distracted by everything around you. You’re not focused on your horse when you’re thinking, “I have the children, my job is bad, I have many bills to pay.” Just focus on your horse—try to read him and try to understand what he needs from the moment you are with him. I hope the stories we shared about the horses that taught us so much, like Dao and Templado, can help many people come back to some basics—first let your heart speak and your feelings. Then, forget everything going on around you and just think of your horse.

F: What we tried not to do is just method. There are already lots of books on that. What I observe most of the time is that people use methods like horses are bicycles. They’re horses. A horse is a big adventure when you start to be with one. We wanted to offer some new ideas of how to work with horses. What we wanted is for people to ask questions about what they’re doing and say, “Why we don’t rethink the situation with horses?”

 

Watch Frédéric share his “adventures” with a couple of his liberty horses in this video:

 

“When it comes to horse people, Frédéric Pignon and Magali Delgado are the most outstanding souls I know,” says photographer Gabriele Boiselle who provided many of the images in GALLOP TO FREEDOM and all of the photographs in the new BUILDING A LIFE TOGETHER—YOU AND YOUR HORSE. “The smile of Magali, the hands of Frédéric; I can’t think of anyone else with such a gift for intuitive communication and connection with horses…[Frédéric] has another wonderful talent, an ability to convey his wisdom and experience in words, in moving stories that inspire and motivate others. He is not only a wonderful horseperson, he can share that part of himself so that people understand and can try his methods with their own horses. Everything with Magali and Frédéric is about love and horses…I’m very privileged and happy to work with them both…Over time, our relationships have brought about deep connection, deep satisfaction, and deep insights, bringing us to the conclusion that what can be done with horses can best be done with love.”

 

GALLOP TO FREEDOM and BUILDING A LIFE TOGETHER—YOU AND YOUR HORSE are available from the TSB online bookstore where shipping in the US is FREE.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER NOW

 

Federic, Templado, and Fasto take a break in Malibu.

Federic, Templado, and Fasto take a break in Malibu.

 

 

Read Full Post »

TSB caught up with international dressage star, trainer, motivational speaker, author, and entrepreneur Jane Savoie this month as we celebrate the release of her new book JANE SAVOIE’S DRESSAGE 101 (on sale all this month at the TSB bookstore!) We got to talk about what’s new with her line of Eq-Equisense “sensor-enhanced” tack, which made a splash with international audiences at WEG in 2010. Plus, we got to find out what’s in her refrigerator…or rather, what’s not.

TSB: You always manage to have a multitude of interesting projects going at once. For example, your Eq-Equisense “sensor-enhanced” tack seems to offer riders a legitimate way to “measure” their body position and correct it in real time. What’s up with Equisense in 2011? Are there new developments or special promotions we should know about in the months ahead?

JS: We are opening Training Centers throughout the country. The first one is opening this month (May) at Mistover Farm in Pawling, New York.

TSB: You have established a distinct online presence over the last few years, and much of your work is particularly well-suited to digital forums. What role do you see social media such as Facebook playing in the development of the horse industry in coming years?

JS: Our country is huge, and Social Media allows us to connect with riders not only in this country but all over the world. Yesterday, I heard from three of my Dressage Mentor members (from South Africa, New Zealand, and Hong Kong, respectively) about the success they’ve had using the techniques they’re learning about on my membership site.

TSB author Jane Savoie on her Grand Prix horse Moshi. "He's amazing!" she says.

TSB: What are your personal riding goals for 2011 and beyond?

JS: Continuing to ride Moshi at Grand Prix. He gets better all the time. We’ve finally mastered the one-tempi’s and he does piaffe, passage, and the transitions between the two on a thought. He’s amazing!

TSB: If you were trapped on a desert island with a horse and a book, what breed of horse would it be and which book would you choose?

JS: Probably a Friesian because they’re so affectionate. Moshi is like a black lab in a horse suit. If I took a horse book it would be Complete Training of Horse and Rider by Alois Podhajsky, and if I took a “fun” book I’d choose Knight in Shining Armor by Jude Devereaux.

TSB: What’s in your refrigerator at all times?

JS: It’s usually pretty empty. (And I’ve gone as long as two years without an oven!) Don’t cook. Don’t miss it.

TSB: What is your idea of perfect happiness?

JS: Patting my dog, Indiana Jones Savoie.

TSB: Tell us about the first time you remember sitting on a horse.

JS: I was eight. I rode a 26-year-old horse named “Old Lady.”

TSB: Tell us about the first time you remember falling off a horse.

JS: My third ride. I got run away with on a trail ride. All I remember is the trees going by really fast as I hung on my horse’s neck—until I couldn’t hang on any more.

TSB: What is the quality you most like in a friend?

JS: Loyalty.

TSB: What is the quality you most like in a horse?

JS:  Good work ethic.

TSB: If you could do one thing on horseback that you haven’t yet done, what would it be?

JS: Ride in the 2012 London Olympics.

TSB: What is your idea of the perfect meal?

JS: Lobster and a baked potato.

TSB: What is your idea of the perfect vacation?

JS: I haven’t been on one for so long, I really have to think about this. Maybe visit places that fascinate me—Italy, Hawaii, England, France, Africa.

TSB: If you could have a conversation with one famous person, alive or dead, who would it be?

JS: Tony Robbins.

TSB: What is your motto?

JS: “Those who say it can’t be done shouldn’t interrupt the people doing it.”— Chinese Proverb

Read Full Post »

The much-talked-about meeting between French master Philippe Karl and German trainer Christopher Hess--and the debate over training philosophies.

TSB just added a huge new selection of horse training and riding DVDs to its bookstore. We’re honored to now be the exclusive North American distributor for the highly respected equestrian filmmaker Pferdia TV.

Aspiring vaulters can now learn from the best!

Featuring internationally renowned riders and trainers such as Philippe Karl, Dr. Reiner and Ingrid Klimke, Linda Tellington-Jones, Anja Beran, Peggy Cummings, Richard Hinrichs, and many others, these DVDs are a “who’s who” of movers and shakers in a number of equestrian disciplines. You’ll find titles on classical and competitive dressage, starting young horses, driving, vaulting, in-hand work, long-reining, and trick training, as well as a number of incredible films focusing on breeds, including Friesians, and famous stallions, such as Donnerhall.

TSB now has a whole selection of DVDs for the Friesian fan.

THERE’S SO MUCH TO SEE HERE! Check out our NEW Pferdia TV section at the TSB bookstore NOW.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: