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Posts Tagged ‘Chris Cox’

"Rocky," TSB author Kayla Starnes' surprise champion Toy Aussie. Photo courtesy of Kayla Starnes.

“Rocky,” TSB author Kayla Starnes’ surprise champion Toy Aussie. Photo courtesy of Kayla Starnes.

 

We all know that riders, trainers—and yes, horse book authors—have lives that extend beyond the barn and outside the paddock. Ever wonder what they like to do when they’re not on the back of a horse or teaching a clinic?

TSB author Kayla Starnes, author of the USTRC-endorsed TEAM ROPING 101, is on her way to the Toy Australian Shepherd Association of America (TASAA) National Championships in Ridgefield, Washington, October 16-18, 2013. And Kayla’s not flying all the way from Texas to Washington to ogle Toy Aussies—she and her own pup “Rocky” are competing for the National Championship.

The TASAA National Championships is a specialty show put on once a year for competitors to show off their best Toy Aussie. According to the TASAA website, it is the highest honor to be crowned a TASAA National Champion.

“Toy Australian Shepherds are a smaller version of the standard-sized Aussie,” explains Kayla. “They have the same look and herding ability, in a 13-inch tall package and have become very popular with the horse crowd the past few decades because they are perfectly-sized for the road.”

 

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“The fact that we are going to the National Championship is still crazy to me!” Kayla admits. “Six months ago, I hadn’t ever seen a dog show and Rocky had lived seven years in obscurity as a ranch dog. Then, an acquaintance invited me to a show and we went, just to watch. There, the show secretary told me I really should consider entering my dog, so I did. A fellow competitor was kind enough to show me the ropes and help me with some quick grooming. Rocky ended that day Reserve Best In Show!

“That evening, Rocky managed to steal my chili dog when I wasn’t looking, so I had to buy myself a new dinner. I forgave him, of course, and now it’s tradition—every time he wins, he gets a hotdog. Rocky has eaten a lot of them this summer! He has earned his championship title in conformation, as well as an international championship.

“Nationals will be his last competition. He’s retiring from the show ring and gets to come home and be a dad. In fact, his first puppies are already on their way! That litter should be here just in time for the holidays.”

Kayla assures us that win or lose at Nationals, Rocky gets a chili dog. He’s earned it!

Everyone at TSB wishes Kayla and Rocky the best of luck at the TASAA National Championships next week.

(And stay tuned to the TSB blog for more Secret Lives of Horse Book Authors!)

 

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

TEAM ROPING 101, by Kayla Starnes and endorsed by the USTRC, is available from the TSB online bookstore.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER NOW

 

What they’re saying about TEAM ROPING 101:

“This book will walk you step by step through picking out the perfect team roping horse to preparing for your first competition, and all the training in between. ” —Clinton Anderson, Trainer, Clinician, and Author

“With information covering everything from picking the right horse to roping your first steer, this book will help you on your way to becoming a great team roper.” —Horse & Rider

“The title should have been Team Roping 1001, because it is so full of great information. . . . It’s all here, and it’s a keeper.” —Working Ranch

TEAM ROPING 101 should be the essential tool for team ropers and horse enthusiasts of every age alike!” —Chris Cox, Trainer, Clinician, and Team Roper

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You may not have known that Chris Cox, three-time undefeated world champion of Road to the Horse, is also reserve champion of the Perry Dilorreto Invitational team roping! This famous horseman and clinician finds time to be extremely competitive in this exciting—and growing—sport, including a second-place finish at the 2011 Reno Rodeo Invitational Team Roping held in Reno, Nevada, where Chris and his partner Slick Robison bested over 200 teams and ended the day with nearly $130,000 in their pockets.

Three-time Road to the Horse Champion and team roping competitor Chris Cox says TEAM ROPING 101 is "the essential tool for team ropers and horse enthusiasts of every age."

Chris got his hands on a copy of the new TSB book TEAM ROPING 101 by Kayla Starnes, and here’s what he had to say about it:

TEAM ROPING 101 should be the essential tool for team ropers and horse enthusiasts of every age alike! Author Kayla Starnes takes you down the path to becoming a team roper; from picking out your first rope and first horse to your first team roping competition.

“The book begins with a ‘cheat sheet’ for those not familiar with the team roping language, including terms like ground money, scant and hondo. It then continues by explaining the background and the details about the sport, as well as other horsemanship knowledge. Horse enthusiasts can take advantage of this book with pages about how to select the correct horse for yourself and multiple horsemanship tips and exercises! Starnes maps out the details on how to choose your first horse from their body conformation and correctness to coloring and markings. She also describes a ‘pre-flight’ checklist, a way to see what level rider you are, and various exercises for you and your horse to complete.

“For team ropers, they will find this book to be of the utmost value! From beginner to professional, team ropers can learn how their ropes are created, which rope works best for which level, the groundwork on roping dummies, roping from horseback and finally their first competition. TEAM ROPING 101 is one of the most complete team roping manuals written!”

You can order your copy of TEAM ROPING 101 from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is always FREE.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER TEAM ROPING 101 TODAY.

Chris’ television show Chris Cox Horsemanship airs on RFD-TV three times a week, and he is the author of the book Ride the Journey.

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TSB author Clinton Anderson, Chris Cox, and Pat Parelli competed for the 2011 Road to the Horse Legends crown

You gotta love the way the English language is changing, moment by moment, via online discourse and the perma-audience social media has established. Case in point is the Facebook feed regarding the 2011 Road to the Horse Legends Competition, featuring TSB author Clinton Anderson, Chris Cox, and Pat Parelli (and hosted by TSB author and television personality Rick Lamb).

Sunday morning the following was posted on the “Road to the Horse” Facebook page:

“All three guys caught their horses quickly this morning. And are making great progress already. CA is respecting, CC is preparing and PP is relationshipping…great stuff and 3 very different styles. We are so lucky!”

Obviously, RTTH is getting clever with some of the major tenets in each of these trainers’ philosophies. But just for our own peace o’ mind, let’s break this down so we all can see past the lingo for a minute and actually understand what this short-speak means in terms of horse training.

We can all take a page out of the Clinton Anderson books (see the TSB bookstore for more information on DOWNUNDER HORSEMANSHIP and LESSONS WELL LEARNED) and understand a little of what he means by building a mutual RESPECT between horse and handler/rider.

Clinton believes that RESPECT is the basis of FRIENDSHIP. And to get your horse to respect you, all you have to do is get him to move forward, backward, left, and right, and always reward the slightest try.

Chris Cox has another lead principle. He leans on PREPARATION and claims he never asks a horse to do something he hasn’t first prepared it to do. And by PREPARE Chris doesn’t mean DESENSITIZE.He thinks it is okay for your horse to react to something, although if he’s properly prepared he won’t overreact.

In the meantime, Pat Parelli lists “RELATIONSHIP” as the third of his basic principles. He says you can’t get anywhere with a horse without first establishing a relationship with him. And yes, friends, this is where our new verb comes in…introducing RELATIONSHIPPING (your horse, apparently)…don’t ask us what that means exactly, but it happened today, in Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

We hope that all attendees came away from the event feeling a little closer to understanding horses, a little more confident when getting in the saddle, and a little more fluent in trainer-speak…it is always changing. We at TSB will just try to keep up.

We look forward to hearing where the colts from the 2011 RTTH Competition end up.

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TSB had a chance to catch up with the ever-fun-and-fascinating Rick Lamb on his way back from Equifest of Kansas and before he heads for Murfreesboro, Tennessee, for the 2011 Road to the Horse “Legends” colt-starting competition. For the eighth time (that’s right–he’s seen ’em ALL!) Rick is the emcee, host, and commentator of the event, which this year features the legendary horse training talents of fellow TSB author Clinton Anderson, as well as Chris Cox, and Pat Parelli.

Rick talks horse with Road to the Horse contender Clinton Anderson.

Rick he is truly the “best man for the job” when it comes to providing running commentary for the horse training action ahead. If you haven’t caught his television or radio show, you’re missing out on some of the most informative, well produced horse-related programs available (click on The Horse Show link in our Highly Recommended Links panel for show times).

Rick knows horses, he knows the Natural Horsemanship movement, and he lives and works amongst some of the horse industry’s most learned and influential people. To top it off, the man, frankly, has a way with words. So watch out world, because half the fun February 25, 26, and 27 will be hearin’ what Rick has to say.

Hey, if you’re traveling to Murfreesboro and looking for something to read in the airport or hotel, grab a copy of Rick’s awesome book HUMAN TO HORSEMAN–it’s 40% off through the end of the month at the TSB bookstore!  If you want an honest-to-goodness insider’s look at America’s greatest horsemen and the story of five years of the Road to the Horse competition, this book’s your ticket to being “in the know.”

TSB: You’re about to host the “Road to the Horse” colt-starting competition for the eighth time. This year’s lineup includes Natural Horsemanship heavyweights Clinton Anderson, Chris Cox, and Pat Parelli. What do you think of this year’s competition and what spectators will be able to take away from it?

RL: This will be a master class in colt starting. I recommend that we all pay special attention to how each trainer gains his horse’s trust and gets control of his horse’s feet. What happens early on can have a big effect on the outcome.

TSB: You talk a lot about your experience with “Road to the Horse” in your book Human to Horseman. What are a couple of the most important lessons you’ve learned and been able to apply to your own horses?

RL: 1. Go slowly and don’t scare the horse.  2. Pay special attention to what the horse is saying with his body language and be ready to back off instantly. 3. Don’t worry about anything anyone else is doing.

TSB: What’s new for The Horse Show with Rick Lamb in 2011 and beyond?

RL: We’ll be shooting in Iceland this year so that’s pretty exciting.  Looks like you’ll also see me learn to rope on camera, which is something I’ve always wanted to try with my mare, Candy. I’m also putting a little extra into my radio programs with special guests and topics we’ve never discussed before. I’m blogging like crazy, too, and people seem to enjoy that.  With a little help, I’ve managed to get a strong Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube presence going so we’ll continue all of that, as well.

TSB: If you were trapped on a desert island with a horse and a book, what breed of horse would it be and which book would you choose?

RL: Tough question! I’m a Quarter Horse guy but I also love a good gaited horse. Maybe a Quarter/Rocky Mountain cross? As for the book, it would have to be the complete and unabridged Sherlock Holmes. It’s the book equivalent of comfort food for me!

TSB: What’s in your refrigerator at all times?

RL: Beer.  Nothing but beer.  Just kidding.  Actually, diet coke, frozen veggies, filet mignon, Ezekiel bread, eggs, apples, cheese … and beer.

TSB: What is your idea of perfect happiness?

RL: I define happiness as enjoying the passing of time. I’m sad for people who are always waiting for the future or stewing about the past. That’s not a happy way to live! Happiness is also a choice. I know it sounds clichéd but it’s true. Specific activities that make being happy easier for me are outings with my wife, Diana, playing music, writing, reading, learning, and of course being around horses.

TSB: Tell us about the first time you remember sitting on a horse.

RL: My parents used to take me to Kiddieland, an amusement park in Wichita, Kansas. There was a kid-sized roller coaster, ferris wheel, train, merry-go-round, etc., but my favorite thing was riding the ponies. They went through a little maze without anyone leading them. I felt like I was really riding! I was probably five or six at the time. This was in the late ’50s when Westerns dominated on TV.

TSB: Tell us about the first time you remember falling off a horse.

RL: Actually the first time I fell off was the time I wrote about in Human to Horseman.  Thunder was giving me a rough canter and I spanked him to speed him up and smooth out the gait. He kicked out, I lost my seat and tumbled off, getting stepped on and hurting my back in the process. It took a while to come back from that but I’ve since raced along the beach, jumped through fire, jousted and done mounted shooting. I doubt I’ll ever be a really great rider, but damn, I have fun! The fear of falling off is still there but I’ve thought it through enough now that I think I would handle it better if, God forbid, it did happen again.

TSB: What is the quality you most like in a friend?

RL: I suppose the thing I value most in any relationship is feeling I can totally be myself with the person.  I don’t always have to be smart or funny or even talkative. It takes tremendous pressure off of me to feel I’m accepted as I am.

TSB: What is the quality you most like in a horse?

RL: Willingness to move when I ask for movement and be still when I ask for stillness.

TSB: If you could do one thing on horseback that you haven’t yet done, what would it be?

RL: Dressage. One day, you’ll probably see me trying that on TV, too!

TSB: What is your idea of the perfect meal?

RL: Filet mignon. Steamed asparagus. Small salad. Bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon. Blueberry pie a la mode. Coffee.

TSB: What is your idea of the perfect vacation?

RL: A cruise with Diana to just about anywhere.

TSB: If you could have a conversation with one famous person, alive or dead, who would it be?

RL: Ludwig von Beethoven. As brilliant as he was, he was plagued with self-doubt. He was never completely happy with anything he did. I would like to tell him it’s okay. That’s just how the creative process goes for lots of people. I’d also like to talk to the great horse tamer, John Rarey. He was also a tragic figure in that he died at the height of his fame, at just 38 years of age. His motto was patience, kindness, and firmness, a pretty good prescription for the modern horseman.

TSB: What is your motto?

RL: What a difference a day makes. This is a little reminder I use when things are not going so well. Literally overnight everything can change for the better.

You can catch Rick’s latest episode of The Horse Show, featuring a terrific interview with George and Joann Becker of Valley Spring Foxtrotters in Black, Missouri, on The Horse Show website (and if you’re into Foxtrotters, check out our new book by renowned gaited horse trainer Brenda Imus THE GAITED HORSE BIBLE).

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