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That’s right…it’s that time of year again. We’re loading the books and DVDs in the horse trailer (yes, literally) and getting ready to head south on Interstate 91 for four days of horse-centric fun at Equine Affaire in West Springfield, Massachusetts.

From Thursday November 9 through Sunday November 12, 2017, the Eastern States Exposition is transformed into an equestrian wonderland. With educational clinics and demonstrations, entertainment, shopping, and most importantly, lots and lots of HORSES,  Equine Affaire is an event you don’t want to miss. TSB is proud to have seven authors presenting this year, including:

Phillip Dutton, author of MODERN EVENTING WITH PHILLIP DUTTON.

Sharon Wilsie, co-author of the groundbreaking bestseller HORSE SPEAK.

Wendy Murdoch, author of our popular 5-MINUTE FIXES series.

Margret Henkels, author of IS YOUR HORSE 100%? book and DVD.

Cat Hill, co-author of WORLD-CLASS GROOMING FOR HORSES.

Joyce Harman, author of THE HORSE’S PAIN-FREE BACK AND SADDLE-FIT BOOK.

Jochen Schleese, author of SUFFERING IN SILENCE.

CLICK HERE for the Equine Affaire schedule to see when TSB authors and other top equestrians are presenting.

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TSB Warehouse Manager Marilyn Tobin with the new 6-foot Fergus!

The TSB booth is located at 846/847 in the Better Living Center—come by and see us! We’d love to meet you! Plus, we’ll have our newest releases, our bestselling favorites, show specials, a chance to earn further discounts, product giveaways, and author signings throughout the event.

And the 6-foot Fergus the Horse is BACK! We have a new Giant Fergus Photo Op to celebrate the release of FERGUS AND THE GREENER GRASS, so be sure to swing by and click a pic. Post it and tag it #FERGUSea17ma…we want to see your photos!

See you all in W. Springfield!

 

 

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The dressage warm-up arena can be a crowded place. Photo by Amber Heintzberger from MODERN EVENTING WITH PHILLIP DUTTON.

Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event 2017 starts today with the first horse inspection, and the dressage phase kicks off tomorrow morning. To make sure everyone’s ready to go, here are five tips for warming up prior to your dressage test from MODERN EVENTING WITH PHILLIP DUTTON:

1  Start in walk on a 20-meter circle if the warm-up area is large enough. Introduce “inside leg to outside rein.” I usually start on the left rein, because most horses go better to the left and it starts them off well mentally. Get the horse walking nicely forward, slightly bent around your inside leg, and encourage him to reach softly down and forward.

2  Use some leg-yielding exercises to reaffirm your training and get the horse listening to your leg in both directions, left and right. Once you have his attention at the walk, go to rising trot. Rather than thinking about the the test, focus more on the correctness of the horse: You want him reaching for the bit softly; obedient to inside leg to outside rein; and with flexion to the inside.

3  Do lots of changes of direction and transitions within the trot to keep your horse’s attention and prevent him from getting “stuck.” Once his back is supple and loose, do a little bit of sitting trot, then ask for the canter. 

4  Do canter-trot-canter transitions on each rein. This is a great way of testing how well the horse is on the aids. I don’t want him to run or hollow out, and he should stay obedient through the transition.

5  You can practice specific parts of the test a few times, but when there is one horse to go before you, go back and work on your horse’s correctness–getting him in tune with your aids. Do lots of transitions, keeping the horse listening and thinking. Also, vary the horse’s frame. This last part of the warm-up is really to reinforce his attention on you.

Find more eventing advice in MODERN EVENTING WITH PHILLIP DUTTON, available from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is FREE.

CLICK HERE to download a free chapter or to order.

We’re thrilled to have two TSB authors competing at RK3DE this year: Phillip Dutton and Doug Payne. In addition, professional grooms Emma Ford and Cat Hill, and horseman Dan James, are involved in this exciting equestrian event.

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Photo by Erika N. Walsh

Photo by Erika N. Walsh

We’re counting down the days to the 2016 Thoroughbred Makeover and National Symposium, organized by the Retired Racehorse Project (RRP), a nonprofit dedicated to the placement of ex-racehorses in second careers, and sponsored by Thoroughbred Charities of America.

You can join thousands of others who believe that every Thoroughbred deserves a chance to win at life at the beautiful Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Kentucky, October 27-30, as top trainers engage in the process of transitioning ex-racehorses to second careers. The Thoroughbred Makeover serves as the only national gathering of the organizations, trainers, and farms dedicated to serving OTTBs and features educational clinics and demonstrations, as well as the Makeover Horse Sale and the $100,000 Thoroughbred Makeover competition.

The 2016 Makeover features over 300 Thoroughbreds that began working with trainers from across the country after the first of the year and who will compete in up to two of ten equestrian disciplines to showcase their talents and trainability.

“The Thoroughbred Makeover is a unique opportunity on so many levels,” says one of the event’s judges, TSB author and president of EquestrianCoach.com Bernie Traurig. “First, it’s a wonderful way to see firsthand the great qualities the Thoroughbred has to offer for so many disciplines. There are over 300 OTTBs competing and demonstrating their versatility in a wide array of sports. Second, for those interested in purchasing an OTTB, many, perhaps half, are available to be tried and purchased. David Hopper and I are judging the jumpers, and we are both really excited to see some of these great Thoroughbreds.”

As supporters of the Retired Racehorse Project, TSB is proud to have a number of authors joining Bernie Traurig (creator of DEVELOPING PERFECT POSITION and other DVDs) in this year’s Makeover. BEYOND THE TRACK author Anna Morgan Ford’s OTTB adoption organization New Vocations always has a significant presence at the event, and both Denny Emerson (HOW GOOD RIDERS GET GOOD) and Yvonne Barteau (THE DRESSAGE HORSE MANIFESTO) worked with OTTBs with the competition in mind.

 

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“I did not know of the RRP Thoroughbred Makeover challenge until my friend Lisa Diersen of the Equus Film Festival mentioned it to me,” recounts Barteau. “Since I spent seven years on racetracks, working with Standardbred and Thoroughbred racehorses, and also a few years training ex-racehorses, it seemed like a good thing for me to do.

“I started working with SeventyTwo (‘Indy’) in February,” she says. “I found him a bit aloof at first and also somewhat challenging. He likes a good argument and will try to drag you into one if you are not careful. He is also funny, charming, and extremely clever. He learns things, (good or bad), super fast, so I have had to stay ahead of him in the training game.

“I am having such fun with Indy, I plan on keeping him and continuing to train him up the levels in dressage as well as making an exhibition horse out of him. I don’t know how he will be when I take him to a new environment (the Makeover), so however he acts there will be just part of our journey together. I’m looking forward to it either way!”

Don’t missing seeing Indy and all the other winning ex-racehorses as they show off what they’ve learned over the last few months and compete to be named America’s Most Wanted Thoroughbred! Tickets for the 2016 Thoroughbred Makeover are on sale now (CLICK HERE).

Watch Yvonne and Indy working together in this short video:

 

 

Trafalgar Square Books, the leading publisher of equestrian books and DVDs, is a small business based on a farm in rural Vermont.

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The Trafalgar Square Books offices are located on a Vermont farm. We recognize ourselves as pretty lucky, seeing as in between meetings and calls with authors we can look out the windows and see both horses and Highland Cattle grazing in the green fields that slope up from the barn where our books and DVDs are warehoused toward the treeline in the distance. There is something about seeing, hearing, and breathing horses throughout each work day that is integral to our mission of publishing books “for the good of the horse.”

A few equine members of the “TSB herd” are boarders, a few are training projects and in active work, and then there are a number of “retirees” that are allowed the freedom to roam, pretty much as they wish, in quiet companionship. The horses begin and end their days close to the barn, with paddocks and run-ins directly below our office windows, so we all form relationships of proximity with them—and we know their habits and rituals. We watch them eat breakfast and wander down to the stream for a drink. We see them play in the snow and nap in the sun. We notice how they relate to their pasturemates, the naughty pony, the cranky geese. We think of them all with affection, even though they are not ours to ride, train, or care for.

This past spring, we experienced a farm event that was profoundly moving; one that brought us all together, inspiring discussion and bringing questions to the fore that we had not yet dealt with directly as a collective group.

One morning, the barn manager arrived early in the morning to do chores and found one of the “old fellas,” a Quarter Horse gelding thought to be near 30 years old, in his pasture, unable to move and clearly in severe pain. The veterinarian was immediately called, and upon her arrival she determined the horse had broken his shoulder somehow during the night—a catastrophic accident without obvious cause. The decision was made to euthanize him without delay.

The gelding had long been turned out with two other pensioners, as had been arranged by a charitable owner. All three retirees had lived together contentedly as a small herd with little human interference for a number of years. As the veterinarian attended to the stricken gelding, one of his pasturemates startled her by coming over and lying down beside them, facing the injured horse, and remaining there as the old Quarter Horse took his last breaths. It was uncharacteristic of the companion to approach his pasturemate in such a fashion, and it was especially unusual, seeing as three people were present during the procedure.

The gelding’s owner wished to come say goodbye before his burial, so his body was not moved right away. Remarkably, the companion by his side remained, and when he did rise, it was only to change position before lying down beside his fallen comrade once again. The third horse in their little herd had also joined them, standing nearby, quietly, for quite some time.

The barn manager took a photograph of the scene, not to be macabre but to share what appears to us, at least by our human interpretation, to be the dead horse’s herd holding vigil over a friend’s body.

 

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We are all horse people at Trafalgar Square Books, and as we are learning more about horses as sentient beings and the necessity of ensuring that compassion underlies all that we do with them, this incident moved us all distinctly. We discussed it with each other, and in relation to our own horses, and how the event might affect decisions we make on and around horses in the future. We also shared it with a number of our authors, asking for their thoughts and insight.

“Personally, I feel that we have gone to an extreme with our fear of ‘anthropomorphizing’ human behaviors onto animals,” said Dr. Allen Schoen, who recently co-authored THE COMPASSIONATE EQUESTRIAN with Susan Gordon. “The more we understand the commonality of neuroscience between species, especially mammalian species, the more we can appreciate that animals do grieve in their own way. I have seen this many times personally and have discussed this in my other books Love, Miracles and Animal Healing and Kindred Spirits. We see evidence of this in elephants and many other species. I have seen it in geese, sitting by the side of the road next to their mates who had been killed by a car. I feel it is time that we honor the sentience, the awareness, the consciousness of horses, and their awareness and sensitivity to the death of their companions, as well.”

“Horses use their entire bodies to communicate with each other,” explained Sharon Wilsie, co-author of HORSE SPEAK with Gretchen Vogel. “During the course of a day there are several primary conversations that they may have with each other when out in a herd. One of their favorite conversations is simply called, ‘sharing space.’ To our eyes horses who are sharing space together may seem to be doing nothing more than dozing in the sun or standing around doing nothing. However, once you understand the significance of sharing space you will begin to see the inherent bonding and peacefulness that they are participating in at that moment. When a herd member passes away, sharing space with the departed is the most affectionate and connecting conversation that the living can have, not only with the one who has passed away, but also with each other and inside themselves.

“Although we can only guess at what grief may feel like for a horse it is easy to feel the power of their hearts as they stand guard over the grave of a loved one. Those of us who have been around animals long enough will probably have experienced a horse lingering near the burial site of one who has crossed over that rainbow bridge. Unlike humans who can easily find distraction from our emotional pain, horses live in the present moment and experience the fullness of all of life, including the passing of another that might have been special to them.

“Living in the moment is not always easy for us,” says Sharon. “Perhaps that is why being with horses can feel so healing to our minds, hearts, and souls. Taking a page from their book of life may do us some good in facing what can be a very sad time for us. We, too, can mourn with the dignity, grace, and fullness that horses demonstrate so flawlessly.”

–Rebecca Didier, Senior Editor

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EarthDay16

Back in 2009, TSB teamed up with green-living horsewoman and writer Lucinda Dyer to create the first book of eco-conscious tips and ideas for the equestrian community. ECO-HORSEKEEPING was called a “handy, inspiring, easy-to-read book” that “provides perfectly prepackaged tips, ideas, and expert advice” by Smartpak Founder Rebecca Minard.

“There’s no reason why each and every one of us can’t make owning, riding, and loving horses a planet-friendly activity to be enjoyed for generations to come,” writes Minard in the foreword to ECO-HORSEKEEPING.

On the eve of Earth Day 2016, we again consider the role that each and every one of us plays as stewards of the environment at large, and most certainly of the equine environment—which ensures the health and happiness of our horses. Have each of us taken a few small steps toward limiting our footprint, lowering our impact, and preserving our natural world?

“The following are just a few ways horses and horsepeople impact the environment at large,” write veterinarian Dr. Allen Schoen and horse trainer Susan Gordon in THE COMPASSIONATE EQUESTRIAN. “These are factors that require thought in order to ensure the equine industry is not negatively affecting our world but rather contributing to it in the best way possible.”
• Transportation of feed.
• Maintenance of buildings and facilities to house horses.
• Consumption of water.
• Management of manure and barn waste.
• Transportation of horses to shows, clinics, training facilities.
• Creation of waste related to products and services needed to maintain
domestic horses.
• Runoff from pastures and paddocks.
• Overgrazing land both domestically and in the wild.
• Overpopulation due to overbreeding and unwanted animals.

So how do we put on the green-tinted glasses, and keep them on even when we leave the recycle-friendly world of work and home and head for the barn?

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

When boarding, “research how your horse’s home could possibly be made safer, cleaner, and less toxic, and bring a list of reasonable steps to the barn’s manager,” recommend Dr. Schoen and Gordon. “Offer to help. Many equestrian operations tend to run at low to no profit, so issues of finances are often the first to be considered when changes are suggested. Even when those changes would lead to a much better environment for both horses and humans, the costs may seem prohibitive. Encourage small, affordable steps, as little changes can ultimately make a significant difference in the horse’s well-being.

“When on your own property with just your own horses, you can make a personal project out of determining what will help make your barn and property less toxic and more environmentally friendly. Put together a step-by-step plan, and, then start with the simplest thing. Do what you can under the circumstances and always remember you are benefiting all beings just by becoming conscious and aware of environmental concerns. Horses and equestrian facilities have a significant impact on their immediate and neighboring surroundings and it literally ‘takes a village’ of like-minded participants to become aware of issues with the keeping, feeding, watering, and transportation of animals, and it takes that village once again to actually improve the state of things.”

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

CLICK IMAGE TO ORDER

With small, doable, affordable steps in mind, and the long hot days of summer just around the corner, here are a few water conservation tips from ECO-HORSEKEEPING to kick off your Earth Day 2016 weekend:

  • Lose the Drip: Fix or replace everything in your barn that leaks or drips, be it a faucet, hose, or toilet. A faucet that drips at one drop per second wastes 7 gallons of water a day and 2,700 gallons a year.
  • Go Low-Flow: Make certain all your barn water hoses have nozzles that let you adjust the spray as needed, as well as a “trigger” that allows you to shut off the flow of water completely while soaping up dirty legs or conditioning tangled tails.
  • Reuse Water Whenever Possible: STOP! Before you mindlessly toss that half-a bucket of water from your horse’s stall into the driveway—can it be used to control dust in the round pen or water plants around the barn?
  • Hook Up a Rain Barrel: A rain barrel can be easily connected to one or more of your barn’s downspouts to collect water that would otherwise simply wash away. Use the harvested water to wash trucks, trailers, and farm equipment; water the rings; and cool down hot horses with a pleasant sponge bath.
  • Go Grunge: The easiest step in reducing water use is the obvious one! Get choosy about when and how you use it. Before you hook up the hose yet again: Just how clean does your horse really have to be today? Are you riding in a clinic with George Morris or taking a leisurely afternoon trail ride? Whenever possible, ask yourself, “Will a strong arm and a curry do the job?”

 

ECO-HORSEKEEPING and THE COMPASSIONATE EQUESTRIAN are available from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is FREE.

CLICK HERE for more tips for an Equine-centric Earth Day.

 

Trafalgar Square Books, the leading publisher of equestrian books and DVDs, is a small business based on a farm in rural Vermont.

 

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LTJBookClub

World-renowned authority on animal behavior and creator of the Tellington Method Linda Tellington-Jones invites members of the public to join her and her popular Online Book Club for a conversation with Dr. Allen Schoen about compassion’s role when working with animals, and much, much more.

“I’ve had the pleasure of knowing Dr. Schoen for close to 20 years,” says Linda. “He’s been on our veterinary advisory board for Tellington TTouch Training and we co-taught a workshop together in the late 1980s—sharing our modalities with horses and dogs—he with his holistic, integrative veterinary approach and I with Tellington TTouch.

“With his new book he is once again laying a fresh trail. THE COMPASSIONATE EQUESTRIAN offers new possibilities to the thoughtful horse owner.”

Screen Shot 2016-03-22 at 3.47.16 PMOn Wednesday, March 23, 2016, from 6:00-7:00 pm PT (9:00-10:00 pm ET), you can be part of this revolutionary discussion. You do not have to have read THE COMPASSIONATE EQUESTRIAN to participate and learn from this extraordinary meeting of two of the world’s most exciting advocates for equine welfare. The Book Club meeting is free and open to all.

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/j/849145520

Or iPhone one-tap: 16465588656,849145520# or 14086380968,849145520#

Or Telephone: Dial: +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll) or +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll)
Meeting ID: 849 145 520

International numbers available: https://zoom.us/zoomconference?m=UwSFoJWg-SZrbkunk0wS385C33H4xNo6

 

“I love this book! I believe the Compassionate Equestrian concept is a perfectly presented foundation to support our aim to attain a new level of relationship with the horse. At Equitana in Germany this year we celebrated my 40 years of teaching the Tellington Method around the world, and I was asked what my goal is for the next 20 years. Well, my goal is to increase acceptance of recognizing each horse’s individuality so that more people learn to ride, compete, and work with the horse, coming from a place of compassion and understanding.

“THE COMPASSIONATE EQUESTRIAN is a wonderful, wonderful book that helps show just how more of us can join together to spread this message. I love the authors’ 25 Principles as they give us such clear guideposts as we take steps toward a future where science merges with spirituality. I think it is just brilliant!” —Linda Tellington-Jones, Internationally Acclaimed Authority on Animal Behavior, Author, and Founder of The Tellington Method

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Do you have your copy of UNRELENTING, the George Morris autobiography, yet? This is the book everyone is talking about…and it’s only just been officially released in stores.

“Enlightening and inspiring. And insight into [Morris’s] human failings—his struggles and doubts and worries—made for a much more complete picture of him than has ever been painted. … An unprecedented look into the life of a legend.”—The Chronicle of the Horse

“A sensational, behind-the-scenes history…a surprising, refreshing and sometimes harrowing examination of the man with high standards but a desperate need for ‘wild nights.’” — Horse Nation

“Deliberately no-holds-barred…what lies between the pages of UNRELENTING is very, very good reading. [George Morris] reveals both the vulnerability and strength that made him into the icon he is today. It is perhaps his bravest move yet.” —Street to Stable

“This compelling portrait of one of America’s most renowned horsemen will appeal to anyone who is entranced with the horse-show circuit and high-society culture. Even readers who are less familiar with horses may enjoy the glimpse into life with the rich and famous.” —Library Journal

“People will be talking about this book, so I wouldn’t pass up your chance to get your own copy.” —The Plaid Horse

 

You CAN get your own copy, and have it signed by George Morris himself and his ghostwriter Karen Robertson Terry at two upcoming UNRELENTING book release events:

 

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Saturday, March 12, 2016, Beginning at Noon

The Absolute Horse, 2221 NE 3rd Street, Bend, Oregon

Come enjoy a short talk by Karen Robertson Terry, Bend resident and George’s right-hand-woman in the writing of UNRELENTING, in conjunction with the unveiling of the painting of one of George’s great horses The Jones Boy by artist Kimry Jelen. Enjoy light refreshments as you browse the store and visit with Karen. Copies of UNRELENTING will be available for purchase and signing.

GHMWEF-Signing

Sunday, March 27, 2016, 11:30 am to 3:00 pm

Derby Field

The Stadium at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center, Florida

Catch the $86,000 Suncast 1.50m Championship Jumper Classic and meet George Morris at this special WEF-sponsored event. Copies of UNRELENTING will be available for purchase and signing.

We’ll be announcing more events in honor of the release of George’s autobiography as they are confirmed—stay tuned! And if you can’t wait, you can order UNRELENTING from the TSB online bookstore, where shipping in the US is FREE.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION

Trafalgar Square Books, the leading publisher of equestrian books and DVDs, is a small company located on a farm in rural Vermont.

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